Malcolm Gladwell – His Way: WKT #28

I attended Trinity College with Malcolm Gladwell at the University of Toronto. In the course of the last thirty years we have attended two weddings together; one infamous and bombastic, the other sweet and unforgettable.

This is a slightly longer version of an an interview I did with Malcolm for GovLove International, a podcast about emerging issues and trends in local government. If you’re wondering what links a conversation with Malcolm Gladwell and a website about unsolved murders consider the issues of social justice:

Here is a link (click here) to Malcolm’s Moth Podcast, Her Way: A well-intentioned wedding toast goes horribly awry for a young man and his friends:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Mercey Brothers – Old Loves Never Die:

Malcolm’s podcast Revisionist History can be found here:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://revisionisthistory.com/about

The Knight-Hennessy Scholars Program at Stanford University video:

 

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Theresa Allore – Part 2: The Minds of Madness

 
PART #2 – On November 3rd, 1978, a beautiful 19 year old young woman, by the name of Theresa Allore, completely disappeared from her college campus…in the small borough of Lennoxville, Quebec. Located approximately 2 hours east of Montreal.

Twitter – @madnesspod

Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MadnessPod

 

Index of related unsolved murders in Quebec in the 1970s – Repost

INDEX

18 women

RELATED UNSOLVED MURDERS AND DISAPPEARANCES IN QUEBEC IN THE 1970s

(click on the name for detailed case information)

  1. Alice Pare – Drummondville – April 26, 1971
  2. Norma O’Brien & Debbie Fisher – Chateauguay – 1974-75 (solved / provided for context)
  3. Sharron Prior – Montreal / Longueuil – April 1, 1975
  4. Lise Choquette – East End Montreal / Laval – April 20, 1975
  5. Louise Camirand – Eastern Townships – March 25, 1977
  6. Unidentified (Johanne Lemieux) – Longueuil – April 2, 1977
  7. Jocelyne Houle – East End Montreal / St. Calixte – April 17, 1977
  8. Johanne Danserault – Missing from Fabreville – June 14, 1977
  9. Sylvie Doucet – Missing from East End Montreal – June 27, 1977
  10. Johanne Dorion – Fabreville / Laval / Montreal North – July 9, 1977
  11. Claudette Poirier – Drummondville – July 27, 1977
  12. Chantal Tremblay – Montreal North / Rosemere – July 29, 1977
  13. Helene Monast – Chambly – September 10, 1977
  14. Katherine Hawkes – Montreal North – September 20, 1977
  15. Denise Bazinet – East End Montreal / Saint Luc – October 23, 1977
  16. Manon Dube – Eastern Townships – January 27, 1978
  17. Lison Blais – East End Montreal – June 3, 1978
  18. Theresa Allore – Eastern Townships – November 3, 1978
  19. Unknown Victim 2 (Maria Dolores Brava) – Dorval, Montreal – June 2, 1979
  20. Nicole Gaudreaux – Montreal  – August 3, 1979 
  21. Coda: Tammy Leakey – Dorval, Montreal – March 12, 1981

THINGS WE HAVE LEARNED

  1. The bodies of Sharron Prior and Unidentified were both found on Chemin du Lac in Longueuil. Prior was found April 1, 1975, Unidentified was found April 2, 1977, almost exactly 2 years to the date of the discovery of Prior.
  2. The murders of Prior and Houle are very similar, their crime scenes are practically identical.
  3. Chantal Tremblay took the bus to the Henri Bourassa metro station and disappeared. The bus that Johanne Dorion used to commute to/from Cartierville and Laval was on the Henri Bourassa transit line. Dorion worked in Cartierville, took the bus home, then disappeared. Katherine Hawkes lived in Cartierville, and was commuting home on the bus from downtown Montreal the night she died.
  4. A tape exists of Katherine Hawkes’ killer’s voice. Her assailant called in to police twice the evening that she died to tell them the location of the body. The police recorded it. However it took police almost 18 hours to investigate the location (and this only after 2 citizens had found the body).
  5. Denise Bazinet lived approximately 3 blocks from Lison Blais in Montreal’s East End.
  6. A purse matching the description of the one Lison Blais owned was recovered at the Louise Camirand dump site in Austin. Quebec. This is the same location where clothing matching the description of those last worn by Theresa Allore was also found by hunters.  Finally, the remnant of a shoe was found at the same location matching the description on Chinese slippers last worn by Theresa Allore
  7. Tammy Leakey’s body was found in Dorval less than a mile from where Unknown Victim 2 was found 1 1/2 years earlier.

INVESTIGATIVE RECOMMENDATIONS:

  1. Investigate the deaths of Sharron Prior, Jocelyn Houle and “Unidentified” as possibly connected cases committed by one offender (Suspect #1, The Longueuil Killer). This will require cooperation between the Longueuil and Surete du Quebec police forces.
  2. Investigate the murders Louise Camirand, Helene Monast, Denise Bazinet, Lison Blais, Theresa Allore and Sharron Prior as possibly connected cases committed by one offender (Suspect #2, The Bootlace Killer). This will require cooperation between the Longueuil, Montreal, and Surete du Quebec police forces.
  3. Investigate the murders Chantal Tremblay, Joanne Dorion and Katherine Hawkes as possibly connected cases committed by one offender (Suspect #3, The Commuter Killer). This will require cooperation between the Laval, Montreal, and Surete du Quebec police forces.

Here is a map (click to go to interactive link):

Screen shot 2016-03-22 at 5.55.19 PM

PUBLIC SAFETY RECOMMENDATIONS:

Only three things that can solve a crime:

  1. An eyewitness
  2. A confession
  3. Physical Evidence.

The perpetrators in these cases would have to be – at best – 60 years old today. More than likely they are much older or already dead. Quebec police cannot realistically expect citizens to come forward with new information on these cases when the public is not even aware that the murders occurred, or –  when in some situations – the police refuse to acknowledge that crimes were even committed. Through attrition the Quebec police will ensure that any possibility of a confession or eyewitness testimony in these matters is eliminated. Everyone who touched the case will have died. 

This brings us to the second matter of the destruction of physical evidence. We already have confirmation of evidence destruction by the Surete du Quebec and the Longueuil police. Just yesterday we learned of the recent destruction of evidence by the Montreal police. We suspect that these actions have long been accepted practices by Quebec police. 

By destroying case evidence, by limiting the opportunities of a confession or eyewitness testimony, Quebec police forces have engaged in investigative genocide.

The following actions should be taken immediately:

  1. In addition to Helene Monast and Theresa Allore, the following cases should immediately be added to the Surete du Quebec’s L’équipe des Dossiers non résolus:  Alice Pare, Louise Camirand, Jocelyne Houle, Claudette Poirier, Denise Bazinet, and (if it is in their jurisdiction), Chantal Tremblay.
  2. A unified cold-case task force needs to be created for all of Quebec to ensure cooperation / coordination between Quebec police agencies.
  3. Access to cold-case information for family members of victims needs to be granted immediately. It should not be that I have access to my sister’s case information, while a family like the Dorions or Blais’ are denied access by Laval and Montreal police forces. All Quebec police agencies should be required to provide the same level-of-service to all victims.
  4. An inquiry needs to be made by the Quebec government into the systematic destruction of cold-case physical evidence by Quebec police agencies to ensure the integrity of public safety in the province.
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Minds of Madness Podcast Features Theresa Allore Case

The folks over at The Minds Of Madness have done a podcast focusing on Theresa Allore’s case. Tyler and Bek have done a wonderful job with Part 1. Can’t wait to hear Part 2 which will be coming in a couple of weeks.

Episode 11 – Theresa Allore – Part 1

 

PART #1 – On November 3rd, 1978, a beautiful 19 year old young woman, by the name of Theresa Allore, completely disappeared from her college campus…in the small borough of Lennoxville, Quebec. Located approximately 2 hours east of Montreal.

 

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/themindsofmadness/

Twitter – @madnesspod

Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MadnessPod

Don’t forget to Like, Review, and Share. Please help listeners find this show more easily, by taking the time to review on iTunes. Thank you

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How do you solve a problem like Homolka – redux

“She read a lot of books about murder, just murder, murder murder, many books per week, like “the perfect murder.”..”

—————

I’m looking back a little at the Homolka affair, not because I’m terribly interested, but because the media appears to be missing things… AND I DO have an interest in Quebec.

Homolka’s home in Chateauguay is minutes away from the murder sites of 12-year-old Norma O’Brien and 14-year-old Debbie Fisher.

 

In this TVA interview Homolka’s former partner at the Joliet prison says Homolka still maintained that she was the victim because she was in a relationship with Bernardo:

Also, Homolka never expressed regret for killing the young victims.

“She read a lot of books about murder, just murder, murder murder, many books per week, like “the perfect murder.”..”

So turning again to current events and Homolka volunteering at the school in NDG:

If you look back at Homolka’s sentence in 2005 one of the conditions of her release was the following:

“Have no job or volunteer position with people under the age of 16.”

Further, Judge Jean R. Beaulieu “said Homolka had better obey the conditions over the next 12 months, or else they will be renewed. If she breaks any conditions she faces up to two years in jail.”

So at some point over the past 12-years I guess it’s safe to say that the conditions lapsed and were not renewed.My question is why? They appeared to be good measures and included the following:

Homolka must:

  • Report to the nearest police station on the day of her release and tell them where she is living and who her roommates are.
  • Notify police of any change of name.
  • Report to a police station the first Friday of every month (or arrange another time).
  • Give 96 hours notice if she plans to move.
  • Give three days notice if she plans to go away for more than a weekend.
  • Complete specific information about any travel plans.
  • Give police her travel plans if leaving Quebec.
  • Have no contact with people with a criminal record.
  • Have no contact with her former husband Paul Bernardo.
  • Have no contact with former victims Jane Doe or Nicole T.
  • Have no contact with the families of victims Kristen French or Leslie Mahaffy.
  • Not possess drugs or illicit substances.
  • Not be in a job which gives her access to benzodiazepine, opiates or barbiturates.
  • Have no job or volunteer position with people under the age of 16.
  • Continue therapy and counselling.
  • Provide police with a DNA sample.

Maintaining these conditions would have kept the public at bay, and would have ensured controversies such as what unfolded last week at the Greaves Adventist Academy would have never happened. 

Note also in the conditions that it was Homolka who was to advise authorities where she was living, not the other way around, so it is clear that Homolka chose to live in Chateauguay, it was her own, free decision. Whether that decision was influenced from the knowledge that crimes similar to the French / Mahaffy  murders (the O’Brien / Fisher murders) had occured in Chateauguay remains to be seen. 

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The Ballad of William Fyfe / WKT #26

Notes from the podcast

Prologue: On October 29, 1999 Monique Gaudreau, a 45-year-old nurse at a  hospital in the Laurentians  was found dead at her home  in Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts, Quebec (North of Montreal) . Gaudreau was found in the bedroom.  She had been  beaten, sexually assaulted, and stabbed 55 times. This is the story of William Patrick Fyfe.

Music: The Poppy Family: Evil Grows

William Patrick Fyfe

Some intro on Fyfe:   William Fyfe , known as the Killer Handyman,  Born in late February 1955. One of Canada’s most prolific serial killers. why it’s important to talk about him

So let’s get into how Fyfe was caught.  To answer that we first turn to the case of  Anna Yarnold, a 59-year-old woman who was found dead on October 15, 1999 in Senneville, Quebec (west of Montreal… 1,500 people?). Lived in isolated home on water front.  In analyzing the crime scene police note that the assailant approached the house in a vehicle at night.  Yarnold’s dog was locked in a room with her handbag, wallet.  The body found outside in the garden. Face down in flower bed. There was bruising on the neck and face, and she was beaten with a flower pot. She was initially attacked in the bathroom. She ran outside.  Where she was choked beaten and bashed in the head with a flower pot.  The assailant took credit cards. Police initially suspect her husband, Robert Yarnold because the scene seemed too violent for a mere robbery. crime of passion. There were no forensics / hard to get forensics on an outside murder. (Paul Cherry interviewed, he reported that it probably wasn’t a robbery)

Yarnold & Gaudreau

Police know began to question if this was in some way connected to an incident that happened earlier in the Summer in the West Island of Montreal. In July, 1999 a woman named  Janet Kuckinsky was attacked and murdered on a Bicycle path in the West Island.

At this point police also  go back to the case of  Monique Gaudreau, a 45-year-old victim from Saint Agathe who was beaten, sexually assaulted and stabbed 55 times. However, as with Yarnold police have very little forensics. In fact, not even a robbery, nothing taken.  Outside they find a footprint (blood of Mrs. Gaudreau).  They also find blood droplets belonging to a male individual.  Different causes of death (knife / smashed with pot), therefore different killers?  Forensic biologist Josenthe Prevot:  “It’s difficult to approach violence, to be in there him. To be in the victim’s environment where they live their everyday lives”

Shanahan & Glenn

On November 19th, 1999,  a 55-year old accountant goes missing in Laval, Quebec.   When police go to check her apartment they find four Montreal Gazette’s stacked outside her door.   Teresa Shanahan was found stabbed to death on November 23, 1999.  She had been sexually assaulted,  beaten and stabbed 32 times. The scene was similar to Gaudreau, except there were items missing, jewelry and credit cards. Later there were ATM withdrawals the evening of the murder : $500 / $500.  The assailant obtained her PIN number. At about this time the daughter of Anna Yarnold noticed withdrawals from her account.  Police obtained a grainy / blurry photo produced from ATM, man in kangaroo hoody with a bearded. As Yarnold’s husband was clean shaven this ruled him out.

From this police now piece together that the assailant is torturing victims to obtain PIN numbers. He’s using subterfuge to obtain entry / tradesman or handyman: no break-ins.

December 15, 1999: a  man comes to door of home in Baie-d’Urfé, Quebec (west).   Asks the woman who answers if she’d like any gardening done. He’s doing some work in the area, could he offer services. Woman talks to husband, and then declines the offer.

Across the street on that same day 50-year-old Mary Glenn, was beaten and stabbed to death.  Glenn lived alone in a waterfront home. Same man approaches home. Following morning woman finds her in living room. Interior, beaten, stabbed and violated. Prevost returns. Clothed. Beaten with blunt object.  No forced entry. Very violent, covering many rooms, hair ripped out, blood in multiple rooms. Finished in living room. Turned on back,” beaten to a pulp”  Again, footprints in blood. Blood on hands, washes hands in kitchen sink. Goes to bedroom upstairs, shakes down victim’s purse.  A forensics printer expert,  Jean Paul Menier, finds a finger print. Loads into finger print bank. A match is made: The print is that of  44 year old William Fyfe.

So who is Fyfe?  Born in Toronto, raised in Montreal. Attended Montreal High School, he was known for urinating on the school bus. His first adult run-in with the law was in 1975, when he was charged with theft over $200 in Montreal and sentenced to six months in jail. Since then a series of  BandEs and thefts. He worked as handyman. He was married, separated with a child. Since then several rel/ships. He did home renovations. Last known address was in a town north of Montreal.

At this point the police have a puzzle: Do they go public and risk scaring him off into hiding, or do they act in the importance of the public interest? The police are given several hours to find him. Ex-girl friend tips that he may be staying at mother’s in Barrie Ontario. OPP Detective  Jim Miller goes to mother’s old farm house. Car with QC plates registered to Fyfe. 24 hour surveillance. Determining if enough evidence to arrest. MUC come to Barrie, publish photo of Fyfe. Say he’s suspect, wanted for questioning. Story goes national. Leaves home, goes to Toronto, looks for newspapers, puts in orders for the Gazette. Dec 21st, 1999. Goes to church, drops three pairs of running shoes. Drove away. Spots on shoes that appear to be blood. Police finally close in on Fyfe at the Husky Truck Stop gas station in Barrie on December 22, 1999, he’s placed under arrest for Mary Elizabeth Glenn. “why don’t you shoot me now?”

Fyfe’s Ford Ranger at Husky Truckstop in Barrie, Ontario

 

Corporal Andrew Bouchard, Montreal police : on the investigation. Bouchard head of Montreal’s major crimes division. Interrogation: “arrogant. Cold like a fish”. First night, they don’t get very far. The secure his cigarette butts for DNA.

Hazel Scattolon

Hazel Scattolon, a 52-year-old woman who was stabbed to death and sexually assaulted in March 21, 1981. Scattalon’s son played hockey with Fyfe. Calls in in aftermath. Fyfe had painted in Hazel’s house. Mount Royal. At this point, where they thought they were investigating a series of murders from 1999, Fyfe has the potential of stretching back 18 years

Through it all Fyfe maintained his innocence, but there was simply too much evidence.  There was blood on Fyfe’s  shoes and clothing. In the case of Anna Yarnold police found traces of her blood on Fyfe’s clothing. The prints from the Monique Gaudreau crime scene tied to shoes recovered at the church in Ontario.  Teresa Shanahan’s stolen ring later turned up as one of Fyfe’s possessions. And finally of course the finger print recovered at the Mary Glenn site turned out to be Fyfe’s.

On Sept 21, 2001 Fyfe is sentenced to life in prison wit out parole for 25 years. He denied involvement in the Janet Kuckinsky case.

During these affairs Fyfe hinted at other cases. After his conviction he confessed to 4 more:

Raymond, Poupart-Leblanc, et Laplante

  1. Suzanne-Marie Bernier, a 62-years-old woman who was stabbed and sexually assaulted October 17, 1979 in Cartierville, Montreal
  2. Nicole Raymond, a 26-years-old woman who was stabbed and sexually assaulted on November 14, 1979 in Pointe-Claire, Montreal
  3. Louise Poupart-Leblanc, a 37-years-old woman who was stabbed 17 times and sexually assaulted on September 26, 1987 in Saint-Adèle, Laurentides
  4. Pauline Laplante, a 44-years-old woman who was stabbed and sexually assaulted on June 9, 1989 in Saint-Adèle, Laurentides

And police also later learn that Fyfe was responsible for a string of violent rapes in the 1980s in downtown Montreal  / “The Plumber”  rapes.

Timeline:

  1. Suzanne-Marie Bernier, Cartierville, Montreal, October 17, 1979
  2. Nicole Raymond, Pointe-Claire, Montreal November 14, 1979

GAP

  1. Hazel Scattolon, Mount Royal  March 21, 1981. Stabbed 27 times.

(series  of violent rapes in the 1980s / Plumber Rapes)

  1. Louise Poupart-Leblanc, Saint-Adèle, Laurentides September 26, 1987
  2. Pauline Laplante, Saint-Adèle, Laurentides June 9, 1989

GAP

  1. Janet Kuckinsky, West island   July 1999
  2. Anna Yarnold, Senneville, Quebec (west of Montreal) October 15, 1999
  3. Monique Gaudreau, Sainte-Agathe, October 29,  1999
  4. Teresa Shanahan, Laval, Quebec  November 19  1999
  5. Mary Glenn, Baie-d’Urfé, Quebec (west).  December 15, 1999

So putting the timeline together, Fyfe’s activity crosses two decades 1979 – 1999.

Police begin to ponder the the gaps in time.  And why the slowing of violence? Why did he calm down. Police said Fyfe was always willing to describe  the crimes in vivid detail, but he remained silent as to motive. “What hit you to cause you to kill again? Why did you stab her so many times” /   “that’s for me to know”, Fyfe replied.

In 2000 a task force was formed and Investigation units from Montreal, Laval, SQ went back and check files on 85 cold cases dating back to 1981.

During the 1980s Fyfe lived in St. Laurent (borders Cartierville) , LaSalle, Lachine and Verdun (south of Pointe Saint Charles) during the 1980s and in the Laurentian town of Saint-Jerome in 1993 (north).

He still remains a suspect in at least 5 unsolved murders:

  • 1991 murder of Montrealer Joanne Beaudoin, 35, who was stabbed to death in Town of Mount Royal in May 1990. The killer stole her gray 1987 Honda Accord and several items from her home. Car later found torched.
  • Laval police submitted the case of 55-year-old Theresa Litzak. Her body was found in her Laval apartment on Nov. 22, 1999. Police believe she was killed Nov. 19 (this would mean she was killed the same day as Shanahan who also lived in Laval). She lived alone, as did Yarnold and Glen.
  • 3 Ontario cases.

Looking at our own cases, could Fyfe be a suspect? No: wrong timeline (too young), different modus operandi:

  • Lise Chagnon / Saint Hubert / 1974: entered subterfuge. Struggle, blood in many rooms. Stabbed and bludgeoned .   Fyfe was 19. Saint Hubert adjacent to Longueuil.
  • Roxanne Luce / 1981 / Longueuil.

And Yet:

  • 1977: Hawkes: Beaten, Stabbed, raped, purse missing: Fyfe’s first known murder was in 1979 when he was 24, could he have killed at 22?
  • 1978: Lison Blais: choked, struck on head, raped, purse missing

Note the above two because please only delve back as far as 1979, so we presume they know he was in prison?

  • 1979: Nicole Gaudreault: Beaten about head and raped. Empty purse. Blood on stairs, but extended to back lot: fight?

Was Fyfe operating with a different M.O .at an earlier age, then switched at some point to something less risky? (Outdoors to indoors. Younger to older victims)

Fyfe will be elegible for parole September, 2026. He will be 69 to 70  years of age.

Out music: Terry Jacks / Seasons in the Sun

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Comment résolvez un problème comme Homolka?

Donc, le monde s’élève à nouveau à propos de la dernière transgression géographique de Karla Homolka.

Hier, la Gazette de Montréal a rapporté que le tueur en série canadien a supervisé les enfants de la maternelle de l’Académie Adventiste de Greaves lors d’une excursion en mars et une fois amené son chien à l’école pour les élèves d’animaux de compagnie. Les trois enfants d’Homolka fréquentent l’école privée.

Comme tout parent, je suis outragé. Maintenant, dites-moi comment vous allez mieux gérer la situation. C’est une école privée. L’école connaissait son histoire. Ils ont apparemment pris la décision que tout le monde mérite une seconde chance. Leur décision.

Dans l’affaire pénale contre Karla Homolka, la poursuite lui a donné un accord de cœur doux, après 12 ans de prison, elle a marché en 2005. Encore une fois, leur décision (…effroyable). Au printemps dernier, nous avons appris que Homolka vivait dans la communauté de Chateauguay à la rive sud de Montréal, et le monde était de nouveau indigné. Eh bien, elle doit vivre quelque part? Nous ne la lancerons pas devant les murs de la société.

Je me souviens très bien d’avoir parlé avec un administrateur des services correctionnels de la Colombie-Britannique il y a quelques années, qui a parlé de l’arrestation d’un délinquant sexuel enregistré dans son quartier. Elle a cuit une assiette de biscuits, et elle et sa fille ont traversé la rue pour les présenter à l’homme:

“Salut, bienvenue dans le quartier. Je m’appelle Jane Smith, je travaille pour le département des services correctionnels”

Traduction: “Salut,” Jane Jane, je sais que vous êtes “.

Le point était très simple. Bienvenue, mais je vais regarder. Confiance, mais vérifiez.

Lorsque mes enfants étaient plus jeunes, j’avais l’habitude de passer du temps à sondage périodique de la base de données des délinquants sexuels pour voir qui était entré dans le quartier. Je me suis rapidement arrêté parce qu’il y avait trop d’aller et venir, et je n’avais pas beaucoup des biscuits. Mieux vaut apprendre à mes enfants à être vigilants et à NE PAS CONFIER LES HOMMES. Difficile, je sais, mais pourquoi ne pas couper à la poursuite.

À plus d’attention, je préfère avoir Leanne Teale – le nom d’Homolka qui utilise actuellement – vivant dans mon quartier parce que j’ai identifié la menace, je pourrais atténuer les risques.

Dans tout cela, je crains que les gens manquent d’un problème plus important; La menace d’Homolka pourrait être réelle, et les panneaux d’avertissement sont profondément tissés dans le tissu de l’histoire de Montréal.

En choisissant de vivre sur la rive sud de Montréal, Homolka a sélectionné une communauté avec une histoire tragique remarquablement similaire à celle de Saint Catherines, en Ontario, où Paul Bernardo et Homolka ont menacé les meurtres brutaux de Leslie Mahaffy, âgée de 14 ans, et de 15 ans Kirsten French.

Norma O’Brien and Debbie Fisher

 

 
En 1974-75, la ville de Châteauguay a été secouée par les disparitions et les meurtres de Norma O’Brien, 12 ans, et Debbie Fisher, âgée de 14 ans. Dans un délai d’un an, un jeune délinquant qui s’appelait le chasseur de Châteauguay (“Le Maniaque Pleine Lune”) a été arrêté, mais la communauté n’a jamais complètement récupéré.

 

Kristen French and Leslie Mahaffy

Aller au printemps dernier et avoir une idée de la véritable source de l’indignation de la communauté. Remarquablement, aucune agence de presse ne s’est inquiété de souligner ” l’ironie” d’Homolka en choisissant cette ville. Un journaliste m’a dit à l’époque que «ils ne voulaient pas encore traumatiser les gens», comme si, en tant que société, nous ne pouvions pas avoir de discussions difficiles. Lorsque les médias brouillent de telles conversations, ils font plus de dégâts que de bien, ce qui laisse les communautés à aucun autre recours, mais à la fessée des tours dans les cirques des médias sociaux (et ils n’ont aucun scrupule de remuer ce pot de merde).

Et est-ce que Homolka peut-on se qualifier “d’ironique” à Chateauguay? N’est-il pas possible qu’elle ait délibérément choisi cette communauté parce qu’elle lui était aussi familière que Saint Catherines? Une petite communauté de banlieue, une histoire de tragédie avec deux jeunes victimes d’âge similaire à Mahaffy et French, qui ressemblent physiquement à Mahaffy et French. Homolka a-t-elle appris la tragédie pendant son séjour dans la prison du Québec? Les détenus parlent de ces choses. En bref, Homolka a-t-il choisi Chateauguay parce qu’il se sentait à la maison?

Si vous pensez que l’idée d’un délinquant obligé de ré-vivre les expériences horribles des crimes, le sujet de la fiction considère ceci:


Gilles Pimparé, montré à gauche en 1979
Gilles Pimparé, emprisonné depuis 1979 pour le brutal et infâme meurtre du pont Jacques-Cartier de Maurice Marcil, 14 ans, et Chantal Dupont, 15 ans, a été renvoyée à la libération conditionnelle six fois en 13 ans. Remarquablement, la famille Dupont l’a pardonné, en achetant son histoire qu’il «aimait Chantal trop, c’est pourquoi il devait la tuer». Mais l’une des principales raisons pour lesquelles Pimparé n’a jamais été libéré? Il a gardé un porn stash sur son disque dur qui avait des photos de jeunes filles nues posant au pont Jacques Cartier pour soutenir les décennies de sa paraphilique après les meurtres commis (vous pouvez le consulter en vérifiant ses dossiers de libération conditionnelle).

Je me demande si Homolka avait une intention particulière quand elle a choisi de vivre à Châteauguy. Si j’étais journaliste d’investigation? Je voudrais vérifier si les corrections / libération conditionnelle l’ont assignée à Chateauguy ou si elle l’a choisi.

Faites confiance, mais vérifiez.

How do you solve a problem like Homolka?

So the world’s up in arms again about the latest geographic transgression of Karla Homolka.

Yesterday the Montreal Gazette reported that the Canadian serial killer supervised kindergarten children from the Greaves Adventist Academy on a field trip in March and once brought her dog to the school for students to pet. Homolka’s three children attend the private school ( Karla volunteered at an N.D.G. elementary school ).

Like any parent I am outraged. Now tell me how you’d better handle the situation. It’s a private school. The school knew of her history. They apparently made the decision that everyone deserves a second chance. Their decision.

In the criminal case against Karla Homolka the prosecution gave her a sweet-heart deal, after 12-years in prison she walked in 2005. Again, their (appalling) decision.  Last spring we learned Homolka was living in the Montreal south shore community of Chateauguay, and the world again was outraged. Well she’s got to live somewhere? We’re not going to toss her outside the walls of society.

I well remember speaking with a British Columbia corrections administrator some years ago who talkedto about when a registered sex offender moved into her neighborhood. She baked a plate of cookies, and she and her daughter walked across the street to present them to the man:

“Hi, welcome to the neighborhood. My name’s Jane Smith, I work for the department of corrections,”

Translation: “Hi, “m Jane Smith, I KNOW WHO YOU ARE.”

The point was very simple. Welcome, but I’ll be watching. Trust, but verify.

When my children were younger I used to spend time periodically probing the sex offender database to see who had moved into the neighborhood. I soon stopped because there were just too many coming and going, and I didn’t have that many cookies. Better to teach my kids how to be vigilant, and to NOT TRUST MEN. Harsh, I know, but why not cut to the chase.

On further consideration I might prefer having Leanne Teale – the name Homolka’s currently using – living in my neighborhood because having identified the threat, I could then mitigate the risk.

In all this bluster and bombast I fear people are missing a larger issue; Homolka’s threat might be real, and the warning signs are deeply woven int the fabric of Montreal’s history.

In choosing to live on Montreal’s south shore Homolka selected a community with a remarkably similar tragic history to that of Saint Catherines, Ontario, where Paul Bernardo and Homolka carried out the brutal murders of 14-year-old Leslie Mahaffy and 15-year-old Kirsten French.

Kristen French and Leslie Mahaffy

 

 

In 1974-75 the town of Chateauguay was rocked by the disappearances and murders of 12-year-old Norma O’Brien and 14-year-old Debbie Fisher. Within a year a young offender who came to be known as the Chateauguay Killer (“Le Maniaque Pleine Lune”) was arrested, but the community never fully recovered.

Norma O’Brien and Debbie Fisher

 

 

 

Jump forward to last spring and you get some idea of the true source of the community’s outrage. Remarkably, no news agency bothered to point out the “irony” of Homolka choosing this town. One reporter told me at the time that “they didn’t want to further traumatize people”, as if as a society we are incapable of having difficult discussions. When the media muzzles such conversations they do more damage than good, leaving communities no other resort but to sling shit at the towers in the social media circus (and the media have no qualms about stirring that shit pot).

And can Homolka moving to Chateauguay really be best summed up as “ironic”?  Is it not possible that she deliberately chose this community because it was as familiar to her as Saint Catherines?  A small suburban community, a history of tragedy with two young victims similar in age to Mahaffy and French, who physically resemble Mahaffy and French. Did Homolka learn of the tragedy while serving her time in Quebec prison? Inmates talk about such things. In short, did Homolka choose Chateauguay because it felt like home?

If you think the idea of an offender compelled to re-live the gruesome experiences of crimes the stuff of fiction consider this:

Gilles Pimparé, shown at left in 1979

Gilles Pimparé, imprisoned since 1979 for the brutal and infamous Jacques Cartier Bridge murders of Maurice Marcil, 14, and Chantal Dupont, 15, has been denied parole six times in 13 years.  Remarkably, the Dupont family forgave him, buying his story that he “loved Chantal too much, that’s why he had to kill her.”. But one of the chief reasons Pimparé has never been paroled? He kept a porn stash on his hard drive that had photos of naked young girls posing at the Jacques Cartier Bridge to sustain his paraphiliac fantasy’s decades after the murders were committed (you can look it up by checking his parole records).

So I just wonder whether Homolka had specific intention when she chose to live in Chateauguy. If I were an investigative journalist? I’d want to check and see if corrections  / parole assigned her to Chateauguy or if she chose it.  

Trust but verify.

 

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The 1971 Unsolved Murder of Alice Pare / WKT #25

The murders and criminal investigative failures of Alice Pare and Ursula Schulze.

The Quebec Victims Advocate, Pierre Hugues Boisvenu:

We’re going to go back to some very old cases and see just how little the Quebec police have learned over the last 40 years. We’ll look at the 1971 murder of Alice Pare, then the 1972 murder of Ursula Schulze to shed some light on more recent cases. I am less interested in linking these murders to cases I’ve recently been discussing. I think they serve a greater point in demonstrating the lack of growth in Quebec criminal investigation in the past 40 years.

2015 was quite a year for law enforcement in the United States with questions of accountability and transparency in places like Baltimore and Chicago and Ferguson. There is no reason why this wave shouldn’t transfer itself north of the border to Quebec, not forgetting Fredy Villanueva who’s death trailblazed and foreshadowed  events of last year.

So let’s ride that wave.  First some background:

Alice  Pare

IMG_0317Pare was 14 when she disappeared walking home from a music lesson in Drummondville, Quebec on February 17, 1971. Around 5:30 pm that evening she left the Pavillion de Musique at 466 rue Saint Jean and crossed the street with the intention of using a phone booth to call her mother to pick her up, but she thought better of it and decided to walk the 1/2 mile home to her parents’ at 667 boulevard Mercure.

Pare was missing for 68 days. SQ investigators Aime Allard, M Saint Cyr, and M Bibeau were in charge of the “missing persons” investigation. But while the police were no doubt fumbling around looking for a runaway, the family got it right. Within two weeks of her disappearance her parents were convinced she had been abducted and that her body would be found in the snow.

They were right.

On the morning of April 26, 1971 Three workers (Andre Camirand, Yvon Lampron, Lucien Paquin)  from the farm of Alphege Leclerc on the 3e rang de Sainte-Clothilde de Horton, near Victoriaville, spotted a pair of white boots in a field about 60 feet from the gravel road. When they got closer they discovered the clothed body of Alice Pare lying under a tree.

Called to the scene were detectives Fernand Pepin, Andre Cerutti, Denis Via, Marcel Vigneault, Andre Menard of the Victoriaville Surete du Quebec, and Jacques Gaboury  detached from the SQ headquarters in Montreal. Also on the scene was Dr. Jean-Paul Valcourt of the SQ’s Montreal Laboratoire  Médecine Légale.

Left to right: Jacques Gaboury, Andre Menard , Marcel Vigneault, et Andre Cerutti,

Left to right: Jacques Gaboury, Andre Menard , Marcel Vigneault, et Andre Cerutti,

 

Alice Pare was found fully clothed in her school uniform, her white winter coat had been removed and was near the body. She had been strangled. There was no evidence of sexual assault. Missing was her musical instrument from the day she disappeared, a flute in a black case. The flute was recovered 3 days later next to route 20 between Sainte Clothilde and Saint Albert, about a 10 minute drive from where the body was found.

The case was eventually handed over to Normand Bergeron of SQ Victoriaville, but very little information came forward in the aftermath. Someone claimed they saw Pare getting into a vehicle, a 1970s two door Chevrolet the evening of her disappearance.

IMG_0344

Jump forward to October 28, 1975. Allo Police publishes an article that basically states that the police are fishing for information (“the police learned of certain persons who know the identity of the assassin”). By now the case has been moved to the SQ in Trois Rivieres (if you are counting that  is at least three jurisdictions touching the case) and is now under the command of Raymond Hebert. Hebert expresses the all too familiar SQ refrain that he felt certain that someone would come forward after all these years, but no one ever did. However he believes that things are moving rapidly now. He is certain it will be resolved.

To my knowledge, the case was never solved.

It is curious that the police waited so long to follow up on the case. Why 1975? Perhaps they were getting nervous. Just that Spring 16-year-old Sharon Prior was found brutally murdered in Longeueil. The crime scenes were not dissimilar. Did they sense they were on the brink of something out of control?

Other Factors

Alice Pare came from a very prominent legal family in Quebec.  Her grandfather Joseph Marier was a judge. Her uncle Marcel Marier was a Montreal municipal court judge.  Her other uncle Elphege Marier was a superiour court judge.  Her step-father Paul Chasse was a lawyer in Drummondville. With that kind of clout you’d think there might have been enough influence to bring the matter to justice. Perhaps it speaks to the disconnect between law enforcement and the court system, a dysfunction not uncommon in many places.

Now let’s jump to another case from that era. The murder or Ursula Shulze:

Ursula Schulz

19-year-old Ursula Schulz was abducted at a bus stop in broad daylight the morning of July 13, 1972 in Brossard, Quebec, which is on the South shore of Montreal very near Longueuil. The incident was witnessed by many people who watched a man force Schulze into the back seat of a car, pin her down and attack her, and then quickly drive away across the Champlain Bridge into Montreal (you can read the article here – many thanks to Dale for bringing this to my attention).

Incredibly, no police agency pursues the matter. Schulze’s body is found the next day. She had been strangled.

An inquiry is called. The following year the Quebec Police Commission, who had oversight of all police forces, issues its report. While praising the efforts of on-the-ground constables the report faulted the force director Marcel Renauld and his Assistant Director Paul-Emile Blain for “”learning nothing” from the incident and failing to instruct force members on how to handle major crimes.”. The report goes on to say, “…the “off-hand” manner of force superiors, coupled with the ignorance of force members on procedures and how to use regional communications system, severely hampered the investigation.”

Hold on. It gets better. In fact, I think I need to quote the whole thing:

“…[the duty officer at the time] did not order roadblocks or inform Quebec Provincial Police (QPP) (recall that in that era the QPP were the Surete du Quebec) because this was not “standard practice” in fact, there were no directives on what standard practice was in such a case.

Other duty officers said they did not know that QPP headquarters was not cut in on the regional network used by municipal forces and thought “somebody else” had informed the QPP directly.

… The QPP were informed of the kidnapping 18 hours after it occurred.

Blain and the officer in charge of criminal investigations, spent the day investigating a report of a robbery by four prison escapees which he told the commission he judged the more serious of the cases.

Both he and Director Renaud thought the QPP had been informed of the kidnapping and were investigating it.

The girl’s father testified that when he visited police headquarters the day of the kidnapping, he was told by Director Renaud that the criminal investigation branch had no time to investigate the kidnapping because they were occupied “with more important matters.””

I know. What a fuck up, right?

Ready for the punchline? Despite the lack of communication. Despite the QPP not being informed. The QPP beat Renaud, Blain and the rest of the Brossard force to the crime scene.

So what was the outcome?

Well I can tell you that shortly thereafter there was a wave of consolidation of regional Quebec forces. Most, like Lennoxville and Coaticook, got swallowed up under the umbrella of the Surete du Quebec. Brossard was merged with the Longeueil police: You need only talk to the family of Sharon Prior to understand their special brand of dysfunction.

Quite seriously, lack of communication very clearly was the issue, especially in the initial phases of a missing persons investigation. One would have hoped the Quebec Police Commission would have made recommendations to address this failure.

So did they? Apparently not. As I am sure you are by now all aware this case (and that of Alice Pare) sounds very familiar.

Let’s jump forward to July 31st, 2007. 9-year-old Cédrika Provencher disappears one afternoon from her neighborhood in Trois Rivieres, and while the police merely declare that she is “missing”, the media believe she has been kidnapped. Despite reports that Cédrika was seen with a man searching for his lost dog, despite overwhelming evidence that she had been abducted, over a week later, on  August 8th, the Sûreté du Québec issued a wanted notice for Cédrika, suggesting that she had voluntarily run away.

36 years after Alice Pare, 35 years after Ursula Schulze. The Quebec police had learned absolutely nothing.

In fact one of the initial outcomes of the Provencher disappearance was a concerted effort by people like Senator Pierre-Hugues Boisvenu to call on the Surete du Quebec to create a special squad to deal with missing persons in the first 48-hours of disappearance so that communication errors like this didn’t happen again.

Wait a minute. Back up. Shouldn’t that have been an outcome of the Schulze inquiry?

——————-

Let’s look again at the Pare case.

Look I am all for redundancy, everyone needs a back-up. But in my experience too much oversight means no one is accountable or responsible for anything. How many investigators does it take for the Quebec police to solve a murder? How many investigators  were called to the Pare crime scene? I counted at least seven. Here is a photo of the body recovery from the Pare site (I will spare you the more graphic photos, I have them. Very disturbing) .  it looks like a football scrum:

Pare

Pare

And here is a photo from the recovery site of Provencher’s remains:

cedrika

The SQ might think the public is impressed with this, but please believe, it doesn’t give me a warm-and-fuzzy. All I see is evidence being trampled and destroyed by a bunch of amateurs who don’t know a thing about criminal investigation.

———

Now this is the part where someone tries to tell me I just don’t get it. I don’t get police culture. I don’t understand Quebec police culture. I just don’t get it. They are working hard. Very hard. They’ve changed. Just trust us, we’ve changed.

Did you think I was sitting idle these past 13 years? I was biding my time, raising my children. Waiting. Just hoping the Quebec police would do something right – and we all knew they would fall back on old habits – before I spoke out again.

Oh I get it, man. I’ve been working with police forces for over a decade in Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario. I got my Masters in Public Administration, with a focus on Justice Administration. I’ve read all the literature. I’ve worked with police here in Durham every day for the past 17-years. I know all about deployment, patrol, community policing, crime abatement… all of it. I help budget $50 million annually in police salaries, I get it.

And every police agency I talk to? They think the Quebec police are a laughing-stock. A complete joke. Remember that book, Criminal Investigative Failures?  For the last 2 months its been passed around the criminal investigative unit of the Durham police force. Know why?

  1. Because they actually think they could learn something from it.
  2. They can’t believe the incompetence of the Quebec police.

So I know police. Basically there are two types of police officers:

  1. Those that are dedicated and do their jobs.
  2. Those that ride the promotion gravy train, padding their pensions until retirement. Doing the least amount of work possible.

Quebec law enforcement has an overabundance of category 2. And with a powerful union that empowers and enables this behavior. We all know it. So let’s just say it.

———–

I want to return one final time to the Pare case. Remember when I said I wasn’t interested in linking these cases to the portfolio of cases I’ve been looking at (Allore, Camirand, Monast, etc…)?

Well maybe.

Alice Pare is definitely of interest to a case like Sharon Prior in terms of it’s proximity in time (1971 and 1975), and proximity in victim age (14 and 16). Ursula Schulze is also of interest to Prior in terms of the proximity in time (1972 and 1975), but also the proximity of location (Brossard which is adjacent to Longueuil). By the way, none of what I am disclosing is news to Yvonne Prior, the mother of Sharon Prior. She’s been tracking this for years in a paper file (which she’s shown me), she simply doesn’t have a website.

I’ve thought a lot about the Pare murder. Was this a test case by the perpetrator for things to follow? There are many similarities. 

  1. Found in wooded area: Allore, Prior, Camirand, Houle, Dorion, Dube
  2. Partially clothed (or clothing removed but close to body): Prior, Dube, Camirand, Bazinet
  3. Missing identification: Camirand, Monast, Hawkes, Blais, Allore, Basinet
  4. Identification tossed by roadside: Allore

So what is Pare’s identification? Her flute is her identification:

Flute and case, Alice Pare

Flute and case, Alice Pare

 

Think about it.  

I’ll give you an example. I have a daughter a little older than Alice Pare. She has a wallet because she has things to carry in it: Drivers license, debit card. The wallet has a little monkey on it. 

Now I also have a daughter a little younger than Alice Pare. She does not have a purse or wallet. What she does have is a saxophone and case which she carries with her every day to school. When I’m driving home if I want to distinguish her from all the other kids let out of school, I look for the sax case. It is her identification.

This is similar to Provencher and her bike. Provencher (9) is separated from her bike. The bike is found later leaning against a fire hydrant. Elizabeth Bodzy (14) and Claudette Poirier (15) are also separated from their bikes, which are found some distance from the site of disappearance or remains. And not forgetting the very practical fact that a bike is cumbersome, you don’t take it with you. It at least gives you some indication of where the victim was abducted.

Like other victims, perhaps the perpetrator separated Alice Pare from an easy means to identify her, he discarded the flute case several miles from where he disposed of the body. 

The more I think of this, I believe it has less to do with evading capture and more to do with depersonalizing the crime. Identification is symbolic and powerful.

Some things to ponder. More than the police ever offered.

 

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