Authorities confirm body is U-Va. student #HannahGraham

Law Enforcement should not / and will not rush this. Matthew has already been indicted on the Fairfax County rape:  Take the time and get it right.  

From the Washington Post:

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CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — The body found on an abandoned property outside of this college town has been confirmed as the remains of University of Virginia sophomore Hannah Graham, a grim result that came nearly six weeks after the 18-year-old from Fairfax County went missing.

Graham was last seen in the early morning hours of Sept. 13, after she was wandering the Downtown Mall here, about a mile and half from her apartment near U-Va.’s idyllic campus. Police on Sept. 24 arrested Jesse L. Matthew Jr., 32, on charges related to Graham’s disappearance after witnesses identified him as the last person with her.

A graduate of West Potomac High School, Graham was known by friends for her vibrant smile, jovial personality and spontaneous sense of humor. She spent the last night before she went missing socializing with friends from U-Va.’s ski club.

“We are devastated by the loss of our beautiful daughter, Hannah,” her parents, John and Sue Graham, said in a statement Friday after authorities confirmed her death. “Put simply, Hannah lit up our lives, the lives of our family and the lives of her friends and others who knew her. Although we have lost our precious Hannah, the light she radiated can never be extinguished.”

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) expressed sympathy for the Graham family.

“Our hearts are broken by today’s news, but that will not diminish our resolve to get justice for Hannah and her family,” McAuliffe said.

Graham, who police say had been drinking, left her apartment at about midnight on Sept. 13 to meet up with friends, but she became disoriented on Charlottesville’s streets. She began walking east and soon became lost, turned around in a neighborhood where she’d only lived since classes began for the fall semester, about two weeks earlier. Realizing she was in the wrong place, she sent text messages to friends asking for someone to meet up with her.

She arrived by chance at the Downtown Mall, where she was seen walking with Matthew, who at one point had his arm around her, according to surveillance videos police have released. She disappeared shortly after 1 a.m., walking away from a downtown restaurant with Matthew, according to witnesses.

Jenna Van Dyck, 20, a senior who was close friends with Graham, said that the sophomore never meant to be in that area that night.

“What’s most frustrating is that she just got lost and crossed paths with a predator,” Van Dyck said.

A widespread search for Graham commenced in the days following, with authorities and volunteers spreading out across all corners of the city and the surrounding counties of Nelson and Albemarle.

Police on Oct. 18 announced that a Chesterfield County sheriff’s deputy had discovered human remains near a run-down house on Old Lynchburg Road, about 12 miles southwest of Charlottesville.

Hannah Graham’s parents issued a statement upon confirmation that remains found on an abandoned property last week are those of their 18-year-old daughter, who went missing Sept. 13. Read the Graham family’s statement.

“Since the discovery along Old Lynchburg Road, officers and detectives have been working around the clock to process the scene and preserve evidence,” Albemarle County police officials said in a statement Friday. “We remain committed to this investigation and will work to ensure that justice is served.”

Graham’s body was found about five miles from a hayfield where the remains of slain Virginia Tech student Morgan Harrington were discovered in 2010, 101 days after she went missing in October 2009. Two people close to the investigation have told The Washington Post that a “forensic link” between the Graham case and the Harrington investigation have been traced to Matthew’s DNA. No charges have been filed in the Harrington case.

Court records show that Matthew once lived at a home about five miles from where Graham’s body was found. Matthew has been charged with abducting Graham with the intent to sexually assault her.

Albemarle County commonwealth’s attorney Denise Lunsford said that she is exploring additional charges against Matthew. In Virginia, if a victim is killed in the course of an abduction, rape or an attempted rape, it can be charged as a capital offense, which can carry the death penalty or a mandatory life sentence upon conviction.

“We are working diligently with local law enforcement on the investigation to ensure that we make the best determination for our community and the Grahams in the pursuit of justice,” Lunsford said.

Matthew is being held without bond and is expected to be moved to Fairfax County soon to face charges related to a violent sexual assault and attempted slaying that occurred in Fairfax City in 2005. He was indicted in that case this week.

James L. Camblos III, a lawyer who is representing Matthew in the Graham case, said that Matthew’s family expressed sorrow for the Graham family.

“On behalf of the Carr family, and speaking for myself as well, the Graham family is in our thoughts and prayers in their time of bereavement,” Camblos said, referring to Matthew’s relatives. “The Carrs also asked me to say that they will continue to pray for the Grahams and the Harringtons throughout this ordeal.”

Graham’s death is casting a pall over the U-Va. campus in Charlottesville, where thousands of students, alumni and community members plan to gather for homecoming festivities this weekend.

“Hannah showed great promise as a student and as a young woman,” U-Va. president Teresa Sullivan said in a statement. “For Hannah’s young life to end so tragically, and for her destiny of promise to be left unfulfilled, is an affront to the sanctity of life and to the natural order of human events. This is a sorrowful day in the life of the University.”

Abraham Axler, 19, who serves as president of the Class of 2017, said that the ordeal has deeply affected the school. He is among a group of students preparing a memorial on campus to honor Graham.

“It’s very scary that something like this could happen in such a serene place,” said Axler, of New York. “Hannah’s disappearance represents a permanent change in consciousness about what it means to be safe in our community. The legacy of Hannah is how Virginia can be the safest campus in the country.”

Axler said that students and those in the community will be able to visit the memorial on Sunday morning. It will feature a chair constructed of skis, an homage to her passion for the winter pastime, covered with flowers.

The Grahams said that their daughter intended to pursue a career in global public health, where she could offer assistance to those in need.

“It is heartbreaking for us that she was robbed so tragically of the opportunity to fulfill her dream,” the Grahams said.

Since Graham went missing almost six weeks ago, the Grahams have lived what they described as “every parent’s worst nightmare.”

“When we started this journey together, we all hoped for a happier ending,” the Grahams said Friday. “Sadly that was not to be.”

The Grahams also noted that several young women remain missing in the greater Charlottesville area, and throughout the country, who deserve the nation’s attention.

“Although the waiting has ended for us, there are other families both in Virginia and beyond who have not been as fortunate in that their loved ones are still missing,” the Grahams said. “Please continue to hold these families in your thoughts and prayers.”

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Active Shooter incident in Ottawa

Footage from Globe reporter captures exchange of gun fire in Parliament Hill building:

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#DarrenVann : Serial killer suspected as bodies of seven women found in Indiana

This Motel 6 in Hammond, Ind. is where police found one of seven women's bodies the weekend.

This Motel 6 in Hammond, Ind. is where police found one of seven women’s bodies the weekend.

Police investigating the slayings of seven women whose bodies were found over the weekend said Monday it could be the work of a serial killer, and that the suspect has told them his victims might go back 20 years.

Hammond Police Chief John Doughty said at a news conference that the suspect is 43-year-old Darren Vann of nearby Gary, Ind., who was convicted of a sex offence in Texas in 2009. His confession to the slaying of one woman in Indiana led police to the grisly discovery of six other bodies, including three on the same block, authorities said.

He said the Gary slayings appear to have happened recently, though Vann indicated there could be earlier victims. He said police are not actively looking for more bodies and have no indication that any murders have occurred in another state. He said Vann is co-operating with investigators in the hope of making a deal with prosecutors.

“It could go back as far as 20 years, based on some statements we have, but that has yet to be corroborated,” Doughty said.

Charges were expected to be filed later Monday in the death of 19-year-old Afrikka Hardy, whose body was found about 9:30 p.m. Friday at a motel, Doughty said. The Lake County coroner’s office said she was strangled.

Doughty said she was involved in prostitution and had arranged to meet Vann at the motel through a Chicago-area website. Police were called by someone who attempted to reach Hardy and “was provided suspicious text responses that she believed to be from the suspect while he was still inside the motel room.”

The discoveries began after Vann allegedly confessed to killing Hardy, then told investigators where more bodies could be found in abandoned homes in Gary, a deteriorating former steel town about 30 miles southeast of Chicago, police said.

A second body was found Saturday night in an abandoned home in Gary. The coroner said family members identified her as 35-year-old Anith Jones, who had been missing since Oct. 8.

Five other bodies were found on Sunday in various Gary homes, said Doughty, who identified two of the women as Gary residents Teairra Batey, 28, and Christine Williams, 36. Police have not determined the identities of the other three women, including two whose bodies were found on the same block where Jones’s body was found on Saturday.

Police said they took Vann into custody Saturday afternoon after obtaining a search warrant for a home and vehicle in Gary,

Hardy’s mother, Lori Townsend, said police told her that Vann asked that she perform a certain sex act, and “when she said ‘no’ and put up a fight, he snapped and strangled her,” she said, speaking from her home in Colorado. “This man is sick.”

Hardy graduated from high school in late 2013 and planned to go on to college to study music, Townsend said.

“She was full of life. She lit up a room with her smile and her beauty,” she said. “And she had a voice like a songbird.”

Gary, once a thriving steel town that’s known as the birthplace of Michael Jackson, has been struggling for decades. Its population has shrunk and its poverty rate hovers around 40 per cent. Thousands of homes are abandoned, many with weeds choking broken sidewalks — often on the same streets where other homes are tidy and well-kept.

One of the houses where police found a body was overgrown with trees in the front and there was trash strewn in the back of what looked like a falling down garage or shed.

Michael Tarm reported from Chicago. Associated Press writers Tom Davies in Indianapolis and Tammy Webber in Chicago contributed to this report.

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Police search area where remains thought to be those of #HannahGraham were found

The initial interview with SGT Dale Terry who found the remains contained the following:

“It was behind a vacant home, in a dried-up creek bed, Terry said he found a skull and bones, along with a pair of tight, dark-colored pants.”

Description has since been scrubbed:

 

crime

From the Washington Post:

CHARLOTTESVILLE — Police on Sunday combed a narrow two-lane back road near an abandoned property in Albemarle County south of here, where searchers on Saturday found human remains thought to be those of missing University of Virginia student Hannah Graham.

Graham, an 18-year-old from Fairfax County, vanished in the early hours of Sept. 13. Jesse L. Matthew Jr., a 32-year-old Charlottesville man with whom Graham was last seen, was arrested and charged in her disappearance, but the young woman’s whereabouts were unknown.

branchThe remote location where the body was found was within three or four miles of the hayfield where the body of another missing college student was found in 2010. Both Graham and the second woman, Morgan Harrington, a 20-year-old Virginia Tech student, disappeared late at night in Charlottesville.
Police on Sunday blocked off a three-mile section of Old Lynchburg Road near where the body was found as investigators scoured the area. For much of its length the road is unmarked and without shoulders, surrounded by woods that are turning amber, gold and crimson, and with houses set back from the pavement, several with white country fences. A tiny brick church sits at one end of the barricaded stretch, across the road from a cemetery with several dozen weathered tombstones.

The northernmost police barricade on Old Lynchburg on Sunday was at its intersection with Red Hill Road. From that point, Red Hill winds a little more than three miles to the northwest before it borders the 742-acre Anchorage Farm. It was there that Harrington’s skeletal remains were found.
The grim discovery Saturday of human remains on a stretch of road in rual Virginia has put Charlottesville residents on edge. Officials have not determined the identity of the remains. 
Virginia State Police investigators said last month that the arrest of Matthew was a “significant break” in the Harrington case and provided an unspecified “new forensic link” in the quest for her killer.

The remains found Saturday were discovered by a sheriff’s deputy searching an abandoned property, Charlottesville Police Chief Timothy Longo Sr. said. A conclusive identification has not been made and the remains were sent to the Virginia medical examiner’s office for forensic testing.

Longo said Graham’s family members had been notified. They have not commented on the discovery of the remains. Authorities also called off a search for Graham planned for Sunday, saying they would focus on identifying the body.

Graham’s disappearance has shaken Virginia’s flagship public university, where students have held candlelight vigils and worn orange ribbons in the hope of Graham’s return.

Student council president Jalen Ross helped organize a vigil on the U-Va. campus that attracted hundreds of students. Ross and others at the event, which occurred five days after Graham was last seen, spoke about the missing sophomore in the present tense. Now Ross said that the student council was planning a memorial for Graham to provide a central place on campus for students to honor her.​

“Nobody wanted to hear there’s been a body found,” Ross, 21, said Sunday.

But it was the news many students were expecting, Ross said. In the five weeks since Graham disappeared, a dark mood has again descended over the school.

Hannah Graham timeline
“It revives the whole pool of sadness everyone went through originally,” Ross said.

Many students have donned orange ribbons to keep Graham in mind. Every day since Graham vanished, Ross has worn one pinned to his shirt.

“I told myself  I’d wear it until they found her,” Ross said.

Ross said many students recalled that it took investigators 101 days to find Harrington.

“A lot of us were worried that it would take a long time or infinite time to get closure” in Graham’s case, Ross said.

On Sunday afternoon, the Rev. Heather Warren crafted the words for her evening sermon at St. Paul’s Memorial Church, across from the Charlottesville campus.

“It’s just profoundly sad,” Warren said. “There was always this hope that she might be found alive. That’s not there now.”

In the weeks after Graham vanished, the church kept its doors open for students distressed by the sophomore’s disappearance. Warren said the church has helped students find solace in prayer and passages of Scripture. In recent days, Warren said, she has been drawn to Psalm 139, which explores the constant presence of God even in the worst of times.

“Whither can I go from your presence?” Warren said Sunday, quoting the psalm’s first verses. “You might not know what that presence feels like. But that does not mean you are abandoned.” She began Sunday evening’s service with a moment of silence for Graham.

Friends and teachers have described Graham, a 2013 graduate of West Potomac High School in the Alexandria area of Fairfax, as a good student with a sense of humor.

At U-Va., Graham participated in an alternative spring break as a freshman, volunteering to spend long hours rebuilding homes destroyed by tornadoes in Tuscaloosa, Ala. She was known as a central figure in the college’s ski club.

The investigation into Graham’s disappearance has produced leads in other unsolved cases.

Matthew, who had worked as an orderly at the U-Va. hospital, has been linked by DNA evidence to the investigations of two violent crimes: a sexual assault in Fairfax City in 2005 and the abduction and slaying of Harrington, police have said.

He has not been charged in either case.

In addition, two Virginia universities that Matthew attended between 2002 and 2003 said he was implicated in sexual assault cases. Both women declined to press charges against Matthew, and he was not convicted of any crime connected to the allegations.

Graham spent the evening of Sept. 12, a Friday, drinking and socializing with friends near campus before going out about midnight. By 1 a.m., she was seen wandering the Downtown Mall, about a mile and a half from her apartment. She sent messages to friends indicating that she was lost.

Shortly after 1 a.m., witnesses saw Graham with Matthew near the Tempo restaurant.

Brice Cunningham, the owner of Tempo, told The Washington Post that his employees later saw Graham and Matthew leaving the area together. She had not been seen since.

Police quickly focused on Matthew, searching his car and his Charlottesville apartment and eventually seeking a warrant for his arrest. Matthew was arrested Sept. 24 on a beach near Galveston, Tex., more than 1,300 miles from his apartment.

Matthew was charged with abduction with intent to defile, indicating that police think he planned to sexually assault Graham.

He is being held without bond in the Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail.

James L. Camblos III, the lawyer representing Matthew, said he would await further information.

“The police have located human remains, and we will wait to see what the medical examiner says to see who it is,” Camblos said.

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A Black Detective, an 1870 Trial and a What If

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Fantastic. From the New York Times. My favorite part:  “the derring-do of a crack Afro-Creole police detective versed in the latest “French” techniques — seemingly the first black detective in the United States to take part in a case that received national attention”

Michael A. Ross’s ‘Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case

Michael A. Ross, the author of a well-regarded study of the Supreme Court during the Civil War, thought of himself as a “meat and potatoes” legal historian.

But a decade ago in a New Orleans archive, something a bit spicier caught his eye: an 1870 newspaper article describing the “voodoo abduction” of a white toddler by two mysterious black women.

“I thought to myself, ‘This can’t possibly be true,’ ” Mr. Ross recalled recently by telephone.

The voodoo angle turned out to be hysterical rumor. But as he read on, Mr. Ross, now a professor at the University of Maryland, discovered an all-but-forgotten story of a sensational investigation and trial that gripped New Orleans and the national press for almost seven months. “There were so many other twists and turns that I was hooked,” he said.

Those twists, recounted by Mr. Ross in “The Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case: Race, Law and Justice in the Reconstruction Era,”published this week by Oxford University Press, include psychic consultations, a shadowy “House of Secret Obstetrics” and the derring-do of a crack Afro-Creole police detective versed in the latest “French” techniques — seemingly the first black detective in the United States to take part in a case that received national attention, Mr. Ross says.

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Michael A. Ross, author of “The Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case,” at home in Hyattsville, Md. CreditDrew Angerer for The New York Times

The story also offers something else that was all but unheard-of in pre-Civil Rights-era trials involving African-Americans accused of crimes against whites: genuine suspense about the outcome.

Alfred L. Brophy, a historian at the University of North Carolina School of Law, said in an interview that at virtually any other moment, such a case would almost certainly have ended in a “legalized lynching.”

“Ross has unearthed an important story,” Mr. Brophy said. “Historians are going to argue about its broader significance for a long time.”

Beyond academia, Mr. Ross said he hoped his whodunit would add complexity to the public understanding of Reconstruction, restoring a sense of contingency to a period that is too often read as leading inexorably to Jim Crow.

“It was not inevitable that Reconstruction was going to fail,” Mr. Ross said. “There was a moment of real possibility.”

That moment was certainly a fraught one. When Mollie Digby, the 17-month-old daughter of Irish immigrants, was reported to have been kidnapped by two African-American women on June 9, 1870, the case immediately became enmeshed in broader social and political tensions.

To the white press, it was more proof that Louisiana was descending into racial chaos under Henry Clay Warmoth, the Illinois-born radical Republican governor. But to the government, it was a chance to prove that a newly integrated and professionalized police force — 28 percent of New Orleans’s officers were African-American — would aggressively investigate crimes allegedly committed by blacks.

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#HannahGraham Our Greatest Hopes, Our Worst Fears:

Hannah Graham

Hannah Graham

Maybe this will bring some good. Help Save The Next Girl:

WASHINGTON POST

Human remains believed to be those of missing University of Virginia student Hannah Graham have been found on an abandoned property outside Charlottesville, authorities announced Saturday evening.

Graham, 18, of the Alexandria-area of Fairfax County, vanished in the early hours of Saturday Sept. 13. She was last seen by witnesses on the Downtown Mall with a man identified by police as Jesse L. Matthew Jr., 32, of Charlottesville.

Charlottesville Police Chief Timothy Longo Sr. said authorities must still make a conclusive identification of the remains. But he said police have notified the teen’s family. Authorities also said Graham’s case has become a death investigation.

If the body is that of the sophomore, it marks a grim end to a five-week search for the teen, who apparently became lost after a night out drinking and socializing with friends.

The remains were found by a sheriff’s deputy in Albemarle County.

 

“I want to thank everyone who gave up their days, their nights, their weekends,” Longo said of the search for Graham. “People who called, wrote and dropped food and good wishes and words of encouragement to the search groups and the detectives who work so hard through this investigation.”

“Today would have not been possible without their prayers, their encouragement and their help,” the chief said.

Longo said a police official reached out to Hannah Graham’s parents, John and Susan Graham, with “a very difficult phone call to share this preliminary discovery.”

Police said they have been searching the property for any clues, and said they would not release further details at this stage of the investigation.

“Today’s discovery is a significant development. And we have a great deal of work ahead of us. We cannot and we will not jump to any conclusions in regards to today’s discovery,” said Col. Steve Sellers, of the Albemarle County Sheriff’s Office.

“This sadly is now a death investigation,” Sellers said.

Police have said they linked Matthew’s DNA to the investigations of a violent sexual assault in Fairfax City in 2005 and the abduction and murder of Virginia Tech student Morgan Harrington, 20, in October 2009.

Hannah Graham timeline

Matthew has also been identified as a football player who was accused of sexual assault at Liberty University in 2002 and transferred to Christopher Newport University, where he was accused of another sexual assault in 2003 before dropping out. The university investigations did not lead to criminal charges.

James L. Camblos III, the lawyer representing Matthew said he would await further information. “The police have located human remains and we will wait to see what the medical examiner says to see who it is,” Camblos said.

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#HannahGraham case: Hurry up and wait

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I can’t imagine the frustrations of law enforcement in dealing with a case like the disappearance of Hannah Graham / murder of Morgan Harrington / suspect in custody, Jesse Matthew: such a complex and emotionally charged problem.

In an interview with the Associated Press Charlottesville Police Chief Timothy Longo stressed the need, ” as frustrating as it is… to be very careful to get it right, not to rush to judgment.”

What I can imagine is the frustration and confusion caused all too often when law enforcement sends mixed messages to the public. Last week we were told of the utmost urgency to leave no stone unturned. This week’s message from Chief Long is, “he wont rush Hannah Graham investigation”.

To be sure, this is a fast-moving process, and priorities are going to change. But police should be sympathetic to the public’s predicament:

- We are told to check everything immediately, but then asked not to rush.

- We are told that no tip is insignificant, then instructed not to bother the police with information that is not evidentiary. 

It would be helpful if law enforcement could give the public some idea of the kinds of things they are looking for (what exactly might be evidence), but then of course they can’t because that could potentially compromise the investigation. The result is the police have to sift through a lot of irrelevant information, and both sides are left tired and frustrated.

While we wait, a couple of things I’ve observed don’t add up:

Assumptions:

1. Place and time (video surveillance) link Graham to Matthew.

2. DNA links Matthew to Harrington.

3. The discovered black  Pantera t-shirt links to Harrinton (DNA), so then possibly to Matthew.

The black Pantera t-shirt found on a bush outside an apartment building at the corner of 15th Street and Grady Avenue, reportedly was the one Harrington was  wearing when she disappeared after attending an October 17 Metallica concert at John Paul Jones Arena.

The shirt was found 3-weeks after Harrington’s disappearance, spread out on a bush, logo up,  as if it had been placed there to be discovered.  Witnesses state they are certain it was never there in the weeks prior to discovery. And the location is in the heart of Charlottesville / the investigation plot points.

Something isn’t right here. This does not sound like what we’ve been told of Jesse Matthew. The placement of the t-shirt is a deliberate, calculated and bold gesture. Matthew, from all accounts, is reactive and impulsive.  Either:

1. The t-shirt has no link to the Harrington disappearance, and therefore Matthew.

2. Matthew changed his m.o..

3. The police are giving the public bad information.

4. There are errors with some of the facts we have been told.

All comments and opinions are welcome.

 

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Search for #HannahGraham becomes search for evidence

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Despite having covered 70 percent of a proposed search area, it would appear the Virginia Department of Emergency Management is going to have to backtrack on their efforts. 

VDEM spokesperson David Watson has stated that the nature of the search for Hannah Graham has changed since the original community search conducted two weeks ago. Original efforts following Graham’s disappearance were focused on finding a missing person, now search teams are now focused on finding evidence.  Specially trained search officials are using canines to search outdoor areas.

“They are looking for things they weren’t looking for in the community search,” Watson said. “Folks might unknowingly disturb evidence.”.

If this is true, and professionals are now being called in to redo the efforts of volunteer community members, it could be that areas previously searched will need to be searched again.

This kind of work is so difficult. I recall being involved in a search of a wooded area back in 2005. This was in a rural area of Quebec where the body of a victim was found in 1977, and where two hunters thought they spotted clothing matching the description of what my sister was wearing when she went missing back in 1978. Albeit the search took place over 25 years after the events, we had less than a couple of acres to cover of dense woodland (the Graham investigation has targeted an 8 mile radius around downtown Charlottesville). There were about 25 of us over the course of 2 days. We found a lot but to this day I feel we were searching too far West, and therefore in the wrong spot.

What we found:  A shovel, a purse, remains of a woman’s shoe, some other things. We sent it all to a forensics lab in British Columbia (the same lab that processed the recovery site in the Robert Pickton case): the results came up empty: no DNA evidence or forensic ties on any of it.

In my recollection – and don’t be too harsh on me, I haven’t Googled this – these mass searches rarely come up with anything evidentiary (the one exception I recall is the Molly Bish case in MA). It’s usually very much like the discovery of Morgan Hartington’s remains:

Theresa Allore = a muskrat trapper

Theresa Allore’s wallet = a farmer on a tractor

Sharon Prior = a farmer

Louise Camirand = two hunters

Having said that, LE should not stop what they are doing. The case is still relatively fresh: keep looking, keep asking for help.

 

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Le cas assassiner Theresa Allore

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Où est Hannah Graham? J’ai posé cette question par un certain nombre d’affiches. Donc, voici ma réponse, avec les réserves suivantes:

1 Je ne prétends pas savoir où Hannah Graham est. Ce n’est que mon avis. Et à en juger sur ce que j’ai vu jusqu’à présent? La police / FBI savent ce qu’ils font.

2 Je suis sur le point de briser la règle cardinale: Ne pas chasser les suspects. Cela dit, ce n’est plus sur chasse – ce que nous avons dit est – la preuve, pas suspects. Je vais donc éviter ce que j’observe beaucoup de sleuthies font: essayer de cerner tous les cas des personnes / assassiner non résolus manquante sur Jesse Matthew.

3 Pour les parents d’Hannah Graham et Morgan Harrington: Je sais ce que vous allez à travers parce que je suis passé par là. L’assassiner de ma sœur est un cas non résolu froid. Ma famille a vécu avec son être manquant pendant 6 mois. Votre approche en la matière est tout à fait raison. Lien avec l’autre, faire confiance à personne. Les familles éventuellement connectés dans le cas de ma sœur sont très proches (Prior, Monast, Dube). Nous espérons personne. Même le frère de Louise Camirand, qui préfère garder relativement anonyme: nous parlons lorsque cela est nécessaire. Et nous mettons en garde l’autre de l’écrou-emplois. (Pour en savoir plus sur ces cas, cliquez ici.)

Avec ces mises en garde, un peu plus:

1 Je suis une personne relativement saine avec une vie normale. J’ai un 9 à 5. J’ai 3 filles. Ma vie est riche et épanouie. Je n’ai pas besoin d’attention.

2 Je ne suis pas un enquêteur professionnel. Mon expérience vient de vivre avec une cold-case de 35 ans, et 15 ans d’étude en semi-professionnel les motifs de assassiner. Kim Rossmo – qui a inventé le profilage géographique – est un ami; nous avons travaillé ensemble sur le profil des meurtres en série au Québec, et il est toujours disponible pour moi en tant que confidente / consultant. Rossmo a passé du temps à la Fondation de la police à Washington, DC, et a consulté le FBI à Quantico, Virginie: Je serais surpris si elles n’ont pas encore consulté sur ces cas.

3. 15 années m’a eu accès à beaucoup de matériel; J’ai une bibliothèque de plus de 1000 photos de Québec photos de la scène de crime, je n’ai à peu près un accès exclusif à Québec fichiers froid cas (non, vous ne pouvez pas savoir ma source). J’ai souvent demandé des conseils sur les cold-case (pour le meilleur ou pour le pire). Parfois je “pense” mieux que l’application de la loi sur ces questions … c’est sans frapper à la police. Comme je le disais, j’ai 35 ans d’expérience.

4 Et, une fois de plus: je suis un papa. Je ne pouvais pas poster sur ce jusqu’à maintenant parce que je faisais le dîner. Mais je pense à ces choses parce que la nuit dernière ma fille aînée était à un concert jusqu’à 00h30: il est difficile de ne pas penser à ces choses.

Donc, avec cette longue introduction, voici ce que je pense #HannahGraham / #MorganHarrington / #JesseMatthew:

1. je pense que la police ciblent les bons domaines. Je pense que Hannah Graham est ouest ou du sud de Charlottesville. Je crois que c’est sur ​​la base où Morgan Harrington a été vu la dernière fois et où elle a été trouvée (cette trajectoire), où Matthew est né et a vécu récemment, et parce que le Nord et l’Est sont plus urbanisée. Matthews a de l’expérience avec l’Occident (Harrington), et le l’Ouest et du Sud sont plus rural. Aussi, pour une raison quelconque, j’ai observé au fil du temps que les prédateurs ont tendance à chasser à proximité de leur milieu de vie, et de vidage du Sud. Ce n’est pas statistiquement significative, juste quelque chose que j’ai remarqué dans mon expérience.

2. Quelqu’un m’a demandé – si nous supposons Matthew est responsable de l’assassiner de Harrington et la disparition de Graham – étaient les sites d’enfouissement prémédité? Compte tenu de ces hypothèses, je dis Non, si nous prenons le compte de l’attaque de Jesse Matthew sur un pilote pour être vrai, il est très impulsif (considérer les 1.300 mile run à Galveston). Donc, un gars qui réagit, figure alors sur ce qu’il va faire plus tard. Pas de préméditation, mais à l’affût. Un prédateur opportuniste. Bien que je dirais qu’il a appris de l’expérience: impulsif dans le feu de l’action, mais au fil du temps, il a appris à mettre en place les éventualités.

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Where is #HannahGraham? #JesseMatthew #MorganHarrington

I have been asked this question by a number of posters. So here is my answer, with the following caveats:

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1.  I don’t pretend to know where Hannah Graham is. This is just my opinion. And judging on what I’ve seen so far? The police / FBI know what they are doing.

2. I am about to break the cardinal rule: Don’t chase suspects. Having said that, this is more about chasing – what we have been told is – evidence, not suspects. So I will avoid what I observe a lot of sleuthies are doing: trying to pin every missing persons case / unsolved murder on Jesse Matthew.

3. To the parents of Hannah Graham and Morgan Harrington: I know what you are going through because I have been through it. My sister’s murder is an unsolved cold case. My family lived with her being missing for 6 months. Your approach in this matter is absolutely right. Bond with each other, trust no one. The families possibly connected in my sister’s case are very close (Prior, Monast, Dube). We trust no one. Even the brother of Louise Camirand, who prefers to keep relatively anonymous: we talk when necessary. And we warn each other of the nut-jobs. (For more on those cases, click here.)  

With those caveats, a few more:

1. I am a relatively sane person with a normal life. I have a 9 to 5 job. I have 3 daughters. My life is rich and fulfilled. I do not need attention. 

2. I am not a professional investigator. My experience comes from living with a 35 year old cold case, and 15 years of semi-professionally studying the patterns of murder. Kim Rossmo – who invented geographic profiling – is a friend; we worked together on profiling the serial murders in Quebec, and he is always available to me as a confidante / consultant.    Rossmo spent time at the Police Foundation in Washington, DC, and has consulted with the FBI at Quantico, VA: I would be surprised if they haven’t yet consulted on these cases.  

3. 15 years has gained me access to a lot of material; I have a library of  over 1,000 photos of Quebec crime scene photos, I have pretty much exclusive access to Quebec cold-case files (no, you can’t know my source). I have frequently been asked for advice on cold cases (for better or worse).  I sometimes “think” better than law enforcement on these matters… that is no-knock to law enforcement. As I said, I’ve got 35 years of experience.

4. And, one more time: I’m a dad. I couldn’t post about this until now because I was making dinner. But I think of these things because last night my eldest daughter was out at a concert until 12:30 AM: it’s hard not to think of these things.

So with that long introduction, here’s what I think about #HannahGraham / #MorganHarrington / #JesseMatthew:

1. I think police are targeting the right areas. I think Hannah Graham is West or South of Charlottesville.  I believe this based on where Morgan Harrington was last seen and where she was found (that trajectory), where Matthew was born and recently lived, and because the North and East are more urbanized. Matthews has experience with the West (Harrington), and the the West and South are more rural. Also, for what ever reason, I have observed over time that predators tend to hunt near their living environment, and dump South. That’s not statistically significant, just something I’ve noticed in my experience.

2. Someone asked me – if we presume Matthew is responsible for the murder of Harrington and the disappearance of Graham – were the dump sites pre-meditated?  Given those assumptions, I say No. If we take the account of Jesse Matthew’s assault on a driver to be true, he is very impulsive (consider the 1,300 mile run to Galveston).   So, a guy who reacts, then figures out what he’s going to do later. No premeditation, though on the prowl. An opportunistic predator. Though I would say he’s learned from experience: impulsive in the heat of the moment, but over time, he’s learned to put contingencies in place.  

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Ce site est du meurtre non résolu de Theresa Allore qui a été trouvé dans Compton, Québec le 13 Avril, 1979.

Si vous avez n'importe quelles informations à propos de la mort de Theresa et à propos de l'investigation contactent son frère John Allore: johnallore(@)gmail(dot)com. Merci.

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    English flagItalian flagChinese (Traditional) flagPortuguese flagGerman flagFrench flagSpanish flagJapanese flagArabic flagRussian flagDutch flagDanish flagFinnish flagSwedish flagNorwegian flagHebrew flagLatvian flag
This site is about the unsolved murder of Theresa Allore who died November 3, 1978 in the Eastern Townships of Quebec. If you have any information please contact her brother John Allore, johnallore(at)gmail (dot)com

Who Killed Theresa?

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