Who Killed Allore Lumber? / Canadian Timber Trilogy Part III

 

 

The final part of Canadian Timber Trilogy, focusing on the death of The Allore Lumber Company, which rose out of the ashes of The Gilmour Lumber Company.

Includes an interview with my cousin, Paul Allore, who witnessed the downfall of the business.

 

Edward Allore

 

Map of Quebec City settlements circa 1709

 

 

The “Alar” / Allard / Allore allotments Can be seen in right square, upper left

 

The arrival of Les Filles du Roi at Quebec, 1667

 

The Gilmour processing and shipping operation at Wolf’s Cove (also known as L’Anse au Foulon). The road to the right leads up Cote Gilmour Hill to the then residence of John Gilmour / Marchmont House.

 

 

Map of the Wolf’s Cove / L’Anse au Foulon region from the 1800s. The Gilmour property can be seen to the upper-right

 

Marchmont House at the top of Gilmour Hill, residence of John Gilmour. Gentleman pictured is possibly Alan Gilmour Sr.

 

L’Anse au Foulon

 

 

Northwest corner of Rue Saint Sacrement and Rue Saint Francois Xavier in Old Montreal, site of the Gilmour offices in the later 1800s

 

David Gilmour’s father, John Gilmour who committed suicide in 1877

 

David Gilmour’s brother, Alan Gilmour who committed suicide in 1903

 

Circled is my Great Grandfather, Edward Allore. The photo was most likely taken at Mowat Station at Canoe Lake between 1897 and 1899

 

This guy circled is possibly also Edward Allore

 

 

L to R: top: Edward Allore, Mary Cormier, Harry, Wilred, Alfred. Bottom: Charlie, unknown, Chip the dog, Eddie, Lawrence

 

Alfred, Wilfred, Charles and Edward Allore

 

 

Charles Allore in tie, Wilfred Allore in center. Bill Allore is on the far left.

 

 

My uncle Paul Allore to the right. The fuel tanks stood on the other side of front street on the shores of the Trent river.

 

 

 

L to R TOP: My cousin Michael, Paul, my brother Andre. LOWER: My cousin Cathy, Me, and Theresa Allore

 

For an excellent written account of the Gilmour dynasty visit the Marmora Historical Foundations page, THE GILMOUR INFLUENCE by Andrew McDonald and the Hastings County Historical Society (1986)

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