An interesting website about Compton, Quebec… Pouliots

Compton, d’hier a aujourd hui has many historic pictures including this one of King’s Hall circa 1972 that I find disturbing, but I can’t take my eyes off it:

At the site you will learn many telling facts, such as that the Gagnon family has been in the area for over 100 years (Theresa’s body was found adjacent to their farm).

Also, One of the Pouliots has lived on chemin Cochrane since the 1860s; King’s Hall is on the same road (currently the home is occupied by Andre Pouliot).

And speaking of those Pouliots…

It was rumored that the Pouliots once planned a daring prison escape from the headquarters of the Surete du Quebec in Montreal, but I could never find any proof. Well here it is; black, white, read all over:


Christmas 1984: The Pouliots escape from the 11th floor detention centre of this building using 30 bedsheets

Copyright 1984 Bell Globemedia Publishing Inc. and its licensors
All Rights Reserved
The Globe and Mail (Canada)

December 18, 1984 Tuesday

HEADLINE: Bedsheet escapers surrender to police; three others sought

MONTREAL (CP) – Two brothers who escaped from an 11th-floor detention centre surrendered quietly to police at a downtown radio station early today as the search continued for three other fugitives from area jails.

Ronald and Mario Pouliot walked into radio station CKAC last night about 18 hours after they and a third man escaped from a provincial jail by sliding down 30 bedsheets tied together.

The brothers – one awaiting sentencing on a murder conviction and the other awaiting trial on murder charges – were met at the station by their lawyers who negotiated their surrender with police.

”We were surprised,” Quebec provincial police detective Andre Periard said. ”Maybe they understood it was better for them to give themselves up.” Plainclothes officers surrounded the downtown building where the radio station is located. Provincial police Sgt. John Galianos led a five- man squad to the station and arrested the brothers at about 12:15 a.m.

Ronald Pouliot, 24, and his brother, Mario, 20, were taken back to the Parthenais detention centre in east-end Montreal where they were locked up in fourth-floor police cells rather than the 11th-floor quarters where they were previously held.

Police were still searching for Denis Rouette, 27, of Trois-Rivieres who fled with the Pouliots. He was sentenced last January to 10 years in prison on several charges related to armed robbery and prison escape. He was moved to Montreal on Dec. 11 from the federal maximum- security prison at Millhaven, Ont. to testify in a forthcoming trial.

The escape occurred at Montreal’s Parthenais detention centre at 1:30 a.m. yesterday, six hours after the older Pouliot was found guilty of the murder of two of four people found shot to death in an isolated ditch near the Eastern Townships community of Compton Station last June.

During his three-week trial, Ronald Pouliot admitted kidnapping the four victims, aided by several members of his family, in retaliation for vandalism at a nearby cottage owned by the Pouliots.

But he said he did not know the rifle was loaded when he fired the shot which killed Gaston Scalabrini, 24.

After deliberating six days, the jury found him guilty of the first- degree murder of Mr. Scalabrini and the second-degree murder of France Michaud, 21, but acquitted him of the slayings of Jean-Pierre Truchon, 34, and Renaud Paquette, 27.

Mr. Pouliot’s sentencing, scheduled for yesterday, was postponed until Friday. The younger Pouliot was awaiting trial on four first- degree murder charges in connection with the same shootings.

Another Pouliot brother, Serge, also ordered to stand trial in the case, is being held at Parthenais.

Meanwhile, police continued to search for 61-year-old American drug trafficker Robert Eidt, freed yesterday as he was being returned to Bordeaux jail after treatment at a nearby clinic for a skin problem.

Two men armed with a machine gun and a revolver jumped from a car and ordered two guards to unlock handcuffs joining Mr. Eidt and one of his escorts as they were walking back to the jail van.

When the guards said they didn’t have a key, the rescuers produced a pair of metal clippers and cut the handcuffs off Mr. Eidt, serving a one- year term for drug trafficking.

And last night, a 25-year-old convicted thief, Marc Denis, who was not considered dangerous, fled from the Ste-Anne-des-Plaines penitentiary, north of Montreal.

Ronald Schacter, the lawyer representing Ronald and Mario Pouliot, had offered earlier in the day to negotiate their surrender, warning they ”put themselves in a very dangerous situation” by escaping.

Police declined to reveal details of the negotiations at the radio station, but said they ”pertained to their (the Pouliots) safety.” Police earlier questioned a fourth prisoner involved in the Parthenais escape who was caught with one foot out the window as he tried to join the
other three.

Prison director Gilles Roussel said an internal investigation was under way to determine how the three prisoners – all detained in separate cells – organized the escape.

The escape went undetected not only by guards but also by Quebec provincial police working at the building. The detention centre is in a 13-floor building which houses the provincial force’s regional
headquarters, one of the busiest police stations in Quebec.

The detention centre holds men awaiting court appearances or convicts awaiting transfer to other prisons after sentencing. It was opened in 1969 and police then hailed it as escape-proof. However, there have been a number of escapes.

LOAD-DATE: November 10, 2006

———————————
Copyright 1984 Bell Globemedia Publishing Inc. and its licensors
The Globe and Mail (Canada)

December 18, 1984 Tuesday

HEADLINE: Bedsheet escapers surrender to police; three others sought

MONTREAL (CP) – Two brothers who escaped from an 11th-floor detention centre surrendered quietly to police at a downtown radio station early today as the search continued for three other fugitives from area jails.

Ronald and Mario Pouliot walked into radio station CKAC last night about 18 hours after they and a third man escaped from a provincial jail by sliding down 30 bedsheets tied together.

The brothers – one awaiting sentencing on a murder conviction and the other awaiting trial on murder charges – were met at the station by their lawyers who negotiated their surrender with police. ”We were surprised,” Quebec provincial police detective Andre Periard said. ”Maybe they understood it was better for them to give themselves up.”

Plainclothes officers surrounded the downtown building where the radio station is located. Provincial police Sgt. John Galianos led a five- man squad to the station and arrested the brothers at about 12:15 a.m.

Ronald Pouliot, 24, and his brother, Mario, 20, were taken back to the Parthenais detention centre in east-end Montreal where they were locked up in fourth-floor police cells rather than the 11th-floor quarters where they were previously held.

Police were still searching for Denis Rouette, 27, of Trois-Rivieres who fled with the Pouliots. He was sentenced last January to 10 years in prison on several charges related to armed robbery and prison escape. He was moved to Montreal on Dec. 11 from the federal maximum- security prison at Millhaven, Ont. to testify in a forthcoming trial.

The escape occurred at Montreal’s Parthenais detention centre at 1:30 a.m. yesterday, six hours after the older Pouliot was found guilty of the murder of two of four people found shot to death in an isolated ditch near the Eastern Townships community of Compton Station last June.

During his three-week trial, Ronald Pouliot admitted kidnapping the four victims, aided by several members of his family, in retaliation for vandalism at a nearby cottage owned by the Pouliots.

But he said he did not know the rifle was loaded when he fired the shot which killed Gaston Scalabrini, 24.

After deliberating six days, the jury found him guilty of the first- degree murder of Mr. Scalabrini and the second-degree murder of France Michaud, 21, but acquitted him of the slayings of Jean-Pierre Truchon, 34, and Renaud Paquette, 27.

Mr. Pouliot’s sentencing, scheduled for yesterday, was postponed until Friday. The younger Pouliot was awaiting trial on four first- degree murder charges in connection with the same shootings.

Another Pouliot brother, Serge, also ordered to stand trial in the case, is being held at Parthenais.

Meanwhile, police continued to search for 61-year-old American drug trafficker Robert Eidt, freed yesterday as he was being returned to Bordeaux jail after treatment at a nearby clinic for a skin problem.

Two men armed with a machine gun and a revolver jumped from a car and ordered two guards to unlock handcuffs joining Mr. Eidt and one of his escorts as they were walking back to the jail van.

When the guards said they didn’t have a key, the rescuers produced a pair of metal clippers and cut the handcuffs off Mr. Eidt, serving a one- year term for drug trafficking.

And last night, a 25-year-old convicted thief, Marc Denis, who was not considered dangerous, fled from the Ste-Anne-des-Plaines penitentiary, north of Montreal.

Ronald Schacter, the lawyer representing Ronald and Mario Pouliot, had offered earlier in the day to negotiate their surrender, warning they ”put themselves in a very dangerous situation” by escaping.

Police declined to reveal details of the negotiations at the radio station, but said they ”pertained to their (the Pouliots) safety.” Police earlier questioned a fourth prisoner involved in the Parthenais escape who was caught with one foot out the window as he tried to join the
other three.

Prison director Gilles Roussel said an internal investigation was under way to determine how the three prisoners – all detained in separate cells – organized the escape.

The escape went undetected not only by guards but also by Quebec provincial police working at the building. The detention centre is in a 13-floor building which houses the provincial force’s regional headquarters, one of the busiest police stations in Quebec.

The detention centre holds men awaiting court appearances or convicts awaiting transfer to other prisons after sentencing. It was opened in 1969 and police then hailed it as escape-proof. However, there have been a number of escapes.

LOAD-DATE: November 10, 2006

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