Index of related unsolved murders in Quebec in the 1970s – Repost

INDEX

18 women

RELATED UNSOLVED MURDERS AND DISAPPEARANCES IN QUEBEC IN THE 1970s

(click on the name for detailed case information)

  1. Alice Pare – Drummondville – April 26, 1971
  2. Norma O’Brien & Debbie Fisher – Chateauguay – 1974-75 (solved / provided for context)
  3. Sharron Prior – Montreal / Longueuil – April 1, 1975
  4. Lise Choquette – East End Montreal / Laval – April 20, 1975
  5. Louise Camirand – Eastern Townships – March 25, 1977
  6. Unidentified (Johanne Lemieux) – Longueuil – April 2, 1977
  7. Jocelyne Houle – East End Montreal / St. Calixte – April 17, 1977
  8. Johanne Danserault – Missing from Fabreville – June 14, 1977
  9. Sylvie Doucet – Missing from East End Montreal – June 27, 1977
  10. Johanne Dorion – Fabreville / Laval / Montreal North – July 9, 1977
  11. Claudette Poirier – Drummondville – July 27, 1977
  12. Chantal Tremblay – Montreal North / Rosemere – July 29, 1977
  13. Helene Monast – Chambly – September 10, 1977
  14. Katherine Hawkes – Montreal North – September 20, 1977
  15. Denise Bazinet – East End Montreal / Saint Luc – October 23, 1977
  16. Manon Dube – Eastern Townships – January 27, 1978
  17. Lison Blais – East End Montreal – June 3, 1978
  18. Theresa Allore – Eastern Townships – November 3, 1978
  19. Unknown Victim 2 (Maria Dolores Brava) – Dorval, Montreal – June 2, 1979
  20. Nicole Gaudreaux – Montreal  – August 3, 1979 
  21. Coda: Tammy Leakey – Dorval, Montreal – March 12, 1981

THINGS WE HAVE LEARNED

  1. The bodies of Sharron Prior and Unidentified were both found on Chemin du Lac in Longueuil. Prior was found April 1, 1975, Unidentified was found April 2, 1977, almost exactly 2 years to the date of the discovery of Prior.
  2. The murders of Prior and Houle are very similar, their crime scenes are practically identical.
  3. Chantal Tremblay took the bus to the Henri Bourassa metro station and disappeared. The bus that Johanne Dorion used to commute to/from Cartierville and Laval was on the Henri Bourassa transit line. Dorion worked in Cartierville, took the bus home, then disappeared. Katherine Hawkes lived in Cartierville, and was commuting home on the bus from downtown Montreal the night she died.
  4. A tape exists of Katherine Hawkes’ killer’s voice. Her assailant called in to police twice the evening that she died to tell them the location of the body. The police recorded it. However it took police almost 18 hours to investigate the location (and this only after 2 citizens had found the body).
  5. Denise Bazinet lived approximately 3 blocks from Lison Blais in Montreal’s East End.
  6. A purse matching the description of the one Lison Blais owned was recovered at the Louise Camirand dump site in Austin. Quebec. This is the same location where clothing matching the description of those last worn by Theresa Allore was also found by hunters.  Finally, the remnant of a shoe was found at the same location matching the description on Chinese slippers last worn by Theresa Allore
  7. Tammy Leakey’s body was found in Dorval less than a mile from where Unknown Victim 2 was found 1 1/2 years earlier.

INVESTIGATIVE RECOMMENDATIONS:

  1. Investigate the deaths of Sharron Prior, Jocelyn Houle and “Unidentified” as possibly connected cases committed by one offender (Suspect #1, The Longueuil Killer). This will require cooperation between the Longueuil and Surete du Quebec police forces.
  2. Investigate the murders Louise Camirand, Helene Monast, Denise Bazinet, Lison Blais, Theresa Allore and Sharron Prior as possibly connected cases committed by one offender (Suspect #2, The Bootlace Killer). This will require cooperation between the Longueuil, Montreal, and Surete du Quebec police forces.
  3. Investigate the murders Chantal Tremblay, Joanne Dorion and Katherine Hawkes as possibly connected cases committed by one offender (Suspect #3, The Commuter Killer). This will require cooperation between the Laval, Montreal, and Surete du Quebec police forces.

Here is a map (click to go to interactive link):

Screen shot 2016-03-22 at 5.55.19 PM

PUBLIC SAFETY RECOMMENDATIONS:

Only three things that can solve a crime:

  1. An eyewitness
  2. A confession
  3. Physical Evidence.

The perpetrators in these cases would have to be – at best – 60 years old today. More than likely they are much older or already dead. Quebec police cannot realistically expect citizens to come forward with new information on these cases when the public is not even aware that the murders occurred, or –  when in some situations – the police refuse to acknowledge that crimes were even committed. Through attrition the Quebec police will ensure that any possibility of a confession or eyewitness testimony in these matters is eliminated. Everyone who touched the case will have died. 

This brings us to the second matter of the destruction of physical evidence. We already have confirmation of evidence destruction by the Surete du Quebec and the Longueuil police. Just yesterday we learned of the recent destruction of evidence by the Montreal police. We suspect that these actions have long been accepted practices by Quebec police. 

By destroying case evidence, by limiting the opportunities of a confession or eyewitness testimony, Quebec police forces have engaged in investigative genocide.

The following actions should be taken immediately:

  1. In addition to Helene Monast and Theresa Allore, the following cases should immediately be added to the Surete du Quebec’s L’équipe des Dossiers non résolus:  Alice Pare, Louise Camirand, Jocelyne Houle, Claudette Poirier, Denise Bazinet, and (if it is in their jurisdiction), Chantal Tremblay.
  2. A unified cold-case task force needs to be created for all of Quebec to ensure cooperation / coordination between Quebec police agencies.
  3. Access to cold-case information for family members of victims needs to be granted immediately. It should not be that I have access to my sister’s case information, while a family like the Dorions or Blais’ are denied access by Laval and Montreal police forces. All Quebec police agencies should be required to provide the same level-of-service to all victims.
  4. An inquiry needs to be made by the Quebec government into the systematic destruction of cold-case physical evidence by Quebec police agencies to ensure the integrity of public safety in the province.
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MEURTRES NON RÉSOLUES ET DISPARITIONS AU QUÉBEC DANS LES ANNÉES 1970

INDEX

18 women

MEURTRES NON RÉSOLUES ET DISPARITIONS AU QUÉBEC DANS LES ANNÉES 1970

(Cliquez sur le nom de l’information de cas détaillée)

  1. Alice Paré – Drummondville – le 26 Avril, 1971
  2. Norma O’Brien et Debbie Fisher – Chateauguay – 1974-1975 (résolu / prévu pour le contexte)
  3. Sharron Prior – Montréal / Longueuil – 1 Avril, 1975
  4. Lise Choquette – East End Montréal / Laval – 20 Avril, 1975
  5. Louise Camirand – Estrie – 25 Mars, 1977
  6. La Victime Inconnue (Johanne Lemieux) – Longueuil – 2 Avril, 1977
  7. Jocelyne Houle – East End Montréal / Saint-Calixte – le 17 Avril, 1977
  8. Johanne Danserault – Absent de Fabreville – le 14 Juin, 1977
  9. Sylvie Doucet – Absent de East End Montréal – 27 Juin, 1977
  10. Johanne Dorion – Fabreville / Laval / Montréal-Nord – 9 Juillet, 1977
  11. Claudette Poirier – Drummondville – le 27 Juillet, 1977
  12. Chantal Tremblay – Montréal-Nord / Rosemere – 29 Juillet, 1977
  13. Johanne Dorion – Fabreville / Laval / Montréal-Nord – 9 Juillet, 1977
  14. Hélène Monast – Chambly – 10 Septembre, 1977
  15. Katherine Hawkes – Montréal-Nord – 20 Septembre, 1977
  16. Denise Bazinet – East End Montréal / Saint Luc – le 23 Octobre, 1977
  17. Manon Dube – Cantons de l’Est – le 27 Janvier, 1978
  18. Lison Blais – East End Montréal – 3 Juin, 1978
  19. Theresa Allore – Estrie – Novembre 3, 1978
  20. Victime Inconnue 2 (Maria Dolores Brava) – Dorval, Montreal – June 2, 1979
  21. Nicole Gaudreaux, East End Montreal, le 3 Août, 1979
  22. Tammy Leakey – Dorval, Montréal – 12 Mars, 1981

Que nous avons appris

  1. Les corps de Sharron Prior et la victime “non identifiées” ont tous deux été trouvé sur le chemin du Lac à Longueuil. Avant a été recherche 1 Avril 1975, la victime “non identifié” a été trouvés 2 Avril 1977 presque exactement deux années à compter de la date de la découverte de Prior.
  2. Les meurtres de Prior et Houle sont très semblables, leurs scènes de crime sont pratiquement identiques.
  3. Chantal Tremblay a pris le bus jusqu’à la station de métro Henri Bourassa et disparut. Le bus qui Johanne Dorion utilisé pour se rendre à / de Cartierville et Laval était sur la ligne de transit Henri Bourassa. Dorion a travaillé à Cartierville, a pris le bus à la maison, puis a disparu. Katherine Hawkes vivait dans Cartierville, et faisait la navette maison sur le bus du centre-ville de Montréal la nuit elle est morte.
  4. Une bande existe de la voix de l’assassin de Katherine Hawkes. Son agresseur a appelé à la police deux fois le soir où elle est morte pour leur dire l’emplacement du corps. La police a enregistré. Cependant, il a pris la police près de 18 heures pour enquêter sur l’emplacement (et cela seulement après 2 citoyens avaient trouvé le corps).
  5. Denise Bazinet a vécu environ 3 blocks de maisons de Lison Blais dans Montréal Est.
  6. Un sac à main correspondant à la description de l’un Lison Blais a possédé a été récupéré sur le site de décharge Louise Camirand à Austin. Québec. Ceci est le même endroit où les vêtements correspondant à la description de ces derniers portés par Theresa Allore a également été trouvé par les chasseurs. Enfin, le reste d’une chaussure a été trouvé au même endroit correspondant à la description des pantoufles chinoises dernière portés par Theresa Allore
  7. Le corps de Tammy Leakey a été trouvé à Dorval moins d’un mile de l’endroit où la victime inconnue 2 a trouvé 1 1/2 ans plus tôt.

RECOMMANDATIONS INVESTIGATIVE

  1. Enquêter sur les décès de Sharron Prior, Jocelyn Houle et la victime “Non identifiés” comme des dossiers éventuellement connectés commis par un délinquant (Suspect n ° 1, “Le tueur Longueuil”). Cela nécessitera la coopération entre les forces de Longueuil et de la Sûreté du Québec.
  2. Enquêter sur les meurtres Louise Camirand, Hélène Monast, Denise Bazinet, Lison Blais, Theresa Allore et Sharron Prior que les dossiers éventuellement connectés commis par un délinquant (Suspect n ° 2,”The Bootlace Killer”). Cela nécessitera la coopération entre les forces Longueuil, SPVM, et la Sûreté du Québec.
  3. Enquêter sur les meurtres Chantal Tremblay, Joanne Dorion et Katherine Hawkes comme des dossiers éventuellement connectés commis par un délinquant (Suspect n ° 3, “The Commuter Killer”). Cela nécessitera la coopération entre les forces de Laval, SPVM, et la Sûreté du Québec.

Voici une carte (cliquez pour aller à lien interactif):

 

Screen shot 2016-03-22 at 5.55.19 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMANDATIONS DE SÉCURITÉ PUBLIQUE:

Il y a seulement trois choses qui peuvent résoudre un crime.

  • Un témoin oculaire
  • Une confession
  • Evidence Physical.

Les auteurs de ces dossiers non résolus devraient être – au mieux – 60 ans aujourd’hui. Plus que probablement, ils sont beaucoup plus âgés, ou déjà mort. Les policiers du Québec ne peut pas espérer de façon réaliste les citoyens à se présenter avec de nouvelles informations sur ces dossiers non résolus lorsque le public ne sait même pas que les meurtres ont eu lieu, ou – lorsque, dans certaines situations – la police refuse de reconnaître que les crimes ont été commis même. Par attrition, la police du Québec veillera à ce que toute possibilité d’une confession ou le témoignage oculaire de ces questions est éliminé. Tout le monde qui a touché le cas sera mort.

La deuxième question est la destruction de evidences matérielles. Il y a déjà la confirmation de la destruction de evidences par la Sûreté du Québec et la police de Longueuil. Récemment, nous avons appris la destruction de preuves par la police de Montréal dans une affaire de SVPM actuelle impliquant l’agression sexuelle et de tentative de meurder d’un enfant âgé de 11 ans. Nous pensons que ces actions ont été longtemps accepté les pratiques par la police du Québec.

En détruisant les evidences, en limitant les possibilités d’une confession ou des témoignages oculaires, les forces de police du Québec engagent dans le génocide d’enquête.

Les mesures suivantes doivent être prises immédiatement:

  1. Comme les dossiers d’Hélène Monast et Theresa Allore, les cas suivants doivent être immédiatement ajoutés à L’equipe des Dossiers Non Résolus de la Surete du Quebec: Alice Paré, Louise Camirand, Jocelyne Houle, Claudette Poirier, Denise Bazinet, et (si elle est en leur compétence), Chantal Tremblay.
  2. Un groupe de travail unifié pour les dossiers non résolus doit être créé pour l’ensemble du Québec pour assurer une coopération / coordination entre les services de police du Québec.
  3. L’accès aux dossiers pour les membres de la famille des victimes doit être accordée immédiatement. Il ne faut pas que j’ai accès à l’information sur les cas de ma sœur, tandis qu’une famille comme le Dorions ou Blais ‘sont vu refuser l’accès par les forces policières du Laval et SPVM. Tous les services de police du Québec devraient être tenus de fournir le même niveau de service à toutes les victimes.
  4. Une enquête doit être faite par le gouvernement du Québec dans la destruction systématique de froid cas des preuves physiques par les services de police du Québec pour assurer l’intégrité de la sécurité publique dans la province.
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Index of related unsolved murders in Quebec in the 1970s

INDEX

18 women

RELATED UNSOLVED MURDERS AND DISAPPEARANCES IN QUEBEC IN THE 1970s

(click on the name for detailed case information)

  1. Alice Pare – Drummondville – April 26, 1971
  2. Norma O’Brien & Debbie Fisher – Chateauguay – 1974-75 (solved / provided for context)
  3. Sharron Prior – Montreal / Longueuil – April 1, 1975
  4. Lise Choquette – East End Montreal / Laval – April 20, 1975
  5. Louise Camirand – Eastern Townships – March 25, 1977
  6. Unidentified (Johanne Lemieux) – Longueuil – April 2, 1977
  7. Jocelyne Houle – East End Montreal / St. Calixte – April 17, 1977
  8. Johanne Danserault – Missing from Fabreville – June 14, 1977
  9. Sylvie Doucet – Missing from East End Montreal – June 27, 1977
  10. Johanne Dorion – Fabreville / Laval / Montreal North – July 9, 1977
  11. Claudette Poirier – Drummondville – July 27, 1977
  12. Chantal Tremblay – Montreal North / Rosemere – July 29, 1977
  13. Helene Monast – Chambly – September 10, 1977
  14. Katherine Hawkes – Montreal North – September 20, 1977
  15. Denise Bazinet – East End Montreal / Saint Luc – October 23, 1977
  16. Manon Dube – Eastern Townships – January 27, 1978
  17. Lison Blais – East End Montreal – June 3, 1978
  18. Theresa Allore – Eastern Townships – November 3, 1978
  19. Unknown Victim 2 (Maria Dolores Brava) – Dorval, Montreal – June 2, 1979
  20. Nicole Gaudreaux – Montreal  – August 3, 1979 
  21. Coda: Tammy Leakey – Dorval, Montreal – March 12, 1981

THINGS WE HAVE LEARNED

  1. The bodies of Sharron Prior and Unidentified were both found on Chemin du Lac in Longueuil. Prior was found April 1, 1975, Unidentified was found April 2, 1977, almost exactly 2 years to the date of the discovery of Prior.
  2. The murders of Prior and Houle are very similar, their crime scenes are practically identical.
  3. Chantal Tremblay took the bus to the Henri Bourassa metro station and disappeared. The bus that Johanne Dorion used to commute to/from Cartierville and Laval was on the Henri Bourassa transit line. Dorion worked in Cartierville, took the bus home, then disappeared. Katherine Hawkes lived in Cartierville, and was commuting home on the bus from downtown Montreal the night she died.
  4. A tape exists of Katherine Hawkes’ killer’s voice. Her assailant called in to police twice the evening that she died to tell them the location of the body. The police recorded it. However it took police almost 18 hours to investigate the location (and this only after 2 citizens had found the body).
  5. Denise Bazinet lived approximately 3 blocks from Lison Blais in Montreal’s East End.
  6. A purse matching the description of the one Lison Blais owned was recovered at the Louise Camirand dump site in Austin. Quebec. This is the same location where clothing matching the description of those last worn by Theresa Allore was also found by hunters.  Finally, the remnant of a shoe was found at the same location matching the description on Chinese slippers last worn by Theresa Allore
  7. Tammy Leakey’s body was found in Dorval less than a mile from where Unknown Victim 2 was found 1 1/2 years earlier.

INVESTIGATIVE RECOMMENDATIONS:

  1. Investigate the deaths of Sharron Prior, Jocelyn Houle and “Unidentified” as possibly connected cases committed by one offender (Suspect #1, The Longueuil Killer). This will require cooperation between the Longueuil and Surete du Quebec police forces.
  2. Investigate the murders Louise Camirand, Helene Monast, Denise Bazinet, Lison Blais, Theresa Allore and Sharron Prior as possibly connected cases committed by one offender (Suspect #2, The Bootlace Killer). This will require cooperation between the Longueuil, Montreal, and Surete du Quebec police forces.
  3. Investigate the murders Chantal Tremblay, Joanne Dorion and Katherine Hawkes as possibly connected cases committed by one offender (Suspect #3, The Commuter Killer). This will require cooperation between the Laval, Montreal, and Surete du Quebec police forces.

Here is a map (click to go to interactive link):

Screen shot 2016-03-22 at 5.55.19 PM

PUBLIC SAFETY RECOMMENDATIONS:

Only three things that can solve a crime:

  1. An eyewitness
  2. A confession
  3. Physical Evidence.

The perpetrators in these cases would have to be – at best – 60 years old today. More than likely they are much older or already dead. Quebec police cannot realistically expect citizens to come forward with new information on these cases when the public is not even aware that the murders occurred, or –  when in some situations – the police refuse to acknowledge that crimes were even committed. Through attrition the Quebec police will ensure that any possibility of a confession or eyewitness testimony in these matters is eliminated. Everyone who touched the case will have died. 

This brings us to the second matter of the destruction of physical evidence. We already have confirmation of evidence destruction by the Surete du Quebec and the Longueuil police. Just yesterday we learned of the recent destruction of evidence by the Montreal police. We suspect that these actions have long been accepted practices by Quebec police. 

By destroying case evidence, by limiting the opportunities of a confession or eyewitness testimony, Quebec police forces have engaged in investigative genocide.

The following actions should be taken immediately:

  1. In addition to Helene Monast and Theresa Allore, the following cases should immediately be added to the Surete du Quebec’s L’équipe des Dossiers non résolus:  Alice Pare, Louise Camirand, Jocelyne Houle, Claudette Poirier, Denise Bazinet, and (if it is in their jurisdiction), Chantal Tremblay.
  2. A unified cold-case task force needs to be created for all of Quebec to ensure cooperation / coordination between Quebec police agencies.
  3. Access to cold-case information for family members of victims needs to be granted immediately. It should not be that I have access to my sister’s case information, while a family like the Dorions or Blais’ are denied access by Laval and Montreal police forces. All Quebec police agencies should be required to provide the same level-of-service to all victims.
  4. An inquiry needs to be made by the Quebec government into the systematic destruction of cold-case physical evidence by Quebec police agencies to ensure the integrity of public safety in the province.

 

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The Stéphane Luce Interview – WKT #44

 

Stéphane Luce was just 13 years old when his mother, Roxanne Luce was found beaten to death in her apartment, April 2nd, 1981 in Longueuil, Quebec.

The case remains unsolved, and like so many Quebec cold cases from this era its history has more to do with investigative blunders than catching a killer. The case evidence was destroyed by the Longueuil police. Through it all Stéphane has remained dogged and determined in finding his mother’s killer, in spite of the poor efforts of Quebec police. He is a founding member of the Quebec victims association, AFPAD, and champions his own organization, Meurtres et Disparitions Irresolus du Quebec (MDIQ).

Last week, Luce attended the premiere of the film 7 Femmes (now titled “Soixante-dix”). The docudrama by Quebec filmmaker Stephan Parent reveals police negligence in the investigation of 17 cold-cases from the era of the 1970s. Originally co-produced by Ugo Fredette, the film gained controversy last fall when unexpectedly Fredette went on a killing rampage of his own.  Fredette has been charged with 1st and 2nd degree murder of his partner Véronique Barbe, and 71-year-old Yvon Lacasse. 

Fredette was originally charged with playing one of the serial killers in the film. At one time Barbe portrayed one of the victims. The film has since been edited with Barbe being cut from the project, and Fredette only seen from the rear in a hoodie. Nevertheless, many were shocked, including the family of Veronique Barbe (Parent dedicated the film to her memory without consulting the family). Parent has since agreed to re-shoot the film and remove all scenes with Fredette.

 

 

 

 

 

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What’s Past Is Prologue

The Lennoxville & District Women’s Centre asked me to write a piece for it’s series, “16 Days of Action to end Violence against Women”. It was published in today’s Sherbrooke Record:

What’s Past Is Prologue

The recent news of a series of sexual assaults on school campuses in Lennoxville are alarming but not surprising. College campuses are a haven for sexually deviant behavior and have been for at least the last half-century.  I’ll offer a summary of  events from 1978 as a cautionary tale.

Trouble in Lennoxville started as early as January 1978, a Champlain student journalist reported three separate incidents of sexual and verbal assaults on women.  Near Bishop’s College School a young female student was forced to jump from a moving vehicle.  Another student was attacked on Belevedre, dragged to the ground and beaten on the head with a board.  The Lennoxville police failed to take the situation seriously. The police chief argued that in five years there had only been one reported incident of sexual assault. The student journalist did some quick research and discovered that at least eight rapes had occurred in Lennoxville in the course of the previous year.

By February 1978 there were more reports of girls being attacked and molested. The students complained to officials both at Champlain College and Bishops’s University. They also made reports with the police. The girls were scared to walk home at night. Many classes didn’t end until after dark. Lights that were supposed to illuminate the campus had burnt out. Students were scared and anxious. The police and the schools did nothing. The Bishop’s University nurse commented that the situation had, “all been blown out of proportion.” The police chief was soon fired, but his replacement faired no better, soon commenting that “everyone was making a mountain out of a molehill.”

The reporting soon died down, but no one knows whether this was due to a cessation of the assaults (unlikely) or of women simply giving up and failing to report (more probable).  Data from victimization surveys have repeatedly indicated that 67 per cent of violent victimizations go unreported, the so-called, dark figures of victimology (Perreault, 2015). I would suggest that in a campus environment those numbers are much higher.  It would be a serious miscalculation to assume the offenders simply stopped assaulting women.

With the return of students in the Fall of 1978 the problems resurfaced.  By the end of September three incidents of indecent exposure were reported, this time at the local high schools.  In early October a man harassed a female student in an empty  hallway on the Bishop’s campus. Also in late October, a girl was walking to the campus at night when she was confronted by a naked man standing by a tree. Again police tried to brush off the incidents.  Again the student reporter complained that the campus lighting that had been broken the previous winter still had not been fixed. The campus was neither safe nor secure, and women were being forced to walk about late at night in the dark.

Flashers, peepers, prowlers, sex pests… anyone suggesting that this is just “men being men”, abhorrent but ultimately relatively harmless actions of male misogyny does not understand human behavior. Too often it is gateway behavior to something much worse.  My family would eventually pay the ultimate price for institutional inaction when my sister, Theresa Allore, a Champlain student, disappeared on the night of Friday, November 3rd, 1978 and was found five months later semi-naked, in a ditch, the victim of a sexual murder.

Echoes from 1978 resonate today. Thirty-nine years later and Bishop’s / Champlain still hasn’t addressed the problem of inadequate campus lighting.  Students must face a ten-minute walk in the dark between the campus and their residences. In fact, in the wake of the recent assaults, students are now banned from undertaking that walk, and must suffer the inconvenience of a twenty-minute journey around the campus.  My full compliments to the students who refuse to give up on this matter (see the 2016 CBC story, Unlit Campus path increases chances of sexual violence, Lennoxville students say).  Also my compliments to the students for denouncing the schools and the police for their  “…total silence, hypocrisy and indifference”.

The police and schools are not giving away much in terms of the exact nature of the assaults, again leaving residents in the dark. No doubt they would argue that they are trying to maintain the integrity of the investigation. In my experience such justifications are falsehoods. It is more likely they are trying to protect themselves, maintaining the integrity of powerful police and scholastic institutions, at the expense of a vulnerable public.  

Stay vigilant.

John Allore

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Sex Beast: Stuart Peacock / WKT #38

We recount what little we know of Champlain College Residence Supervisor, Stewart Peacock who vanished less than two months after Theresa Allore’s disappearance:

 

From the Manchester Evening News: “Sex Beast: Stuart Peacock”

Here is a link to the Manchester article: Paedophile Stuart Peacock jailed for 14 years following a trial at Manchester Crown Court

 

King’s Hall in 1972, when it was a girls school

 

 

Champlain College “Who’s Who”: Where’s Peacock?

 

The great and long forgotten British band, Charlie. They never charted in the UK, but created some minor hits in North America in the 1970s. Ignore the soft-core porn album covers, and less than stellar lyrics: musically this was a tight outfit:

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DNA databases

From a comment thread in response to familial DNA information, no reason this shouldn’t be out in the open:

The family of Lindsey Nicholls, her sister Kim and her mother Judy Peterson, say they’re still looking for answers into her 1993 disappearance. (CBC)

If I remember correctly, there is a dna database for unsolved homicides. There is also a dna database for sexual offenders. So the trick of it is to get these two databases to talk to each other. Complicating matters is the issue of missing persons, I believe in Canada it is not yet legal to collect familial dna in these instances to potentially match against unidentified human remains ( although many have been fighting for this for over 20 years).

Ultimately it is a garbage in / out issue. Police agencies are not very good at loading dna from victims into the database, nor are they diligent about checking for matches. This is one – of several – reasons often cited for why the homicide clearance rate in Canada has not dropped in over 50 years despite: 1. improved technology and 2. an overall drop in the number of homicides / violent crime. (I believe the Canadian homicide clearance rate has hovered around 85% as a national average for the last 5 decades.)…

and of course, the Quebec clearance rate is about 10% lower… because Quebec criminal investigators are buffoons.

The whole issue is (another) travesty of Canadian criminal justice. 

 I remember being at a conference in Canada in… 2003? and hearing a presentation by Judy Peterson, mother of Lindsey Nicolls who disappeared in 1993. Judy had done all the leg work. The government named the databank item “Lindsey’s Law” (which they always do, and is kind of degrading: name the legislation after a victim to make it look like they care about them), but then of course the item got tabled or something, governments changed… There’s Judy Peterson waiting 25 years for answers…

The excuses I’ve heard are: No one wants to pay for it, and no one at the RCMP has put in the time to figure out just exactly how the thing would work.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/missing-persons-dna-remains-databank-1.4095878

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